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Financial Education and Timely Decision Support: Lessons from Junior Achievement

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  • Bruce Ian Carlin
  • David T. Robinson

Abstract

Using data from a finance theme park at Junior Achievement of Southern California, we explore how timely decision support is impacted by previous exposure to financial education. Some students received a 19-hour curriculum before participating, and some did not. Trained students were more frugal, paid off debt faster, and relied less on credit financing. However, trained students purchased less comprehensive health insurance, exposing themselves to greater financial risk and wealth volatility. This disparity can be explained by differences in decision support within the park. As such, it appears that education and decision support should be considered complements, not substitutes.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruce Ian Carlin & David T. Robinson, 2012. "Financial Education and Timely Decision Support: Lessons from Junior Achievement," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 305-308, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:102:y:2012:i:3:p:305-08
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.102.3.305
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    Cited by:

    1. Grohmann, Antonia & Kouwenberg, Roy & Menkhoff, Lukas, 2015. "Childhood roots of financial literacy," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 114-133.
    2. Cai, Jing & Song, Changcheng, 2017. "Do disaster experience and knowledge affect insurance take-up decisions?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 83-94.
    3. Shen, Chung-Hua & Lin, Shih-Jie & Tang, De-Piao & Hsiao, Yu-Jen, 2016. "The relationship between financial disputes and financial literacy," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 46-65.
    4. Duca, John V. & Kumar, Anil, 2014. "Financial literacy and mortgage equity withdrawals," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 62-75.
    5. Kiliyanni, Abdul Latheef & Sivaraman, Sunitha, 2016. "The perception-reality gap in financial literacy: Evidence from the most literate state in India," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 47-64.
    6. Zhi-fang Su & Yujen Hsiao & Mei-Yuan Chen, 2015. "Effects of Higher Education on the Unconditional Distribution of Financial Literacy," Journal of Economics and Management, College of Business, Feng Chia University, Taiwan, vol. 11(1), pages 1-22, January.

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