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Heterogeneity in Neighborhood-Level Price Growth in the United States, 1993-2009

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  • Fernando Ferreira
  • Joseph Gyourko

Abstract

Examination of detailed geographical information on U.S. housing transactions from 1993 to 2009 find much heterogeneity at the neighborhood level in when the recent boom began, how big the initial jumps in price growth were, how long the booms lasted, and what types of neighborhoods boomed first. There is less neighborhood-level heterogeneity in when the bust began and in aggregate price appreciation during the boom. This heterogeneity suggests that there was no one dominant cause of the boom. We also comment on how very local data may help understand the role of contagion, among other housing market phenomena.

Suggested Citation

  • Fernando Ferreira & Joseph Gyourko, 2012. "Heterogeneity in Neighborhood-Level Price Growth in the United States, 1993-2009," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 134-140, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:102:y:2012:i:3:p:134-40
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.102.3.134
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Card & Alexandre Mas & Jesse Rothstein, 2008. "Tipping and the Dynamics of Segregation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(1), pages 177-218.
    2. John Cotter & Stuart Gabriel & Richard Roll, 2011. "Integration and Contagion in US Housing Markets," Papers 1110.4119, arXiv.org.
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    1. Yang, Jian & Yu, Ziliang & Deng, Yongheng, 2018. "Housing price spillovers in China: A high-dimensional generalized VAR approach," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 98-114.
    2. Yang, Jian & Tong, Meng & Yu, Ziliang, 2021. "Housing market spillovers through the lens of transaction volume: A new spillover index approach," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 351-378.
    3. Shao, Adam W. & Hanewald, Katja & Sherris, Michael, 2015. "Reverse mortgage pricing and risk analysis allowing for idiosyncratic house price risk and longevity risk," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 76-90.
    4. Knut Are Aastveit & Andr� K. Anundsen, 2017. "Asymmetric effects of monetary policy in regional housing markets," Working Papers No 7/2017, Centre for Applied Macro- and Petroleum economics (CAMP), BI Norwegian Business School.
    5. Takaaki Ohnishi & Takayuki Mizuno & Tsutomu Watanabe, 2019. "House Price Dispersion in Boom-Bust Cycles: Evidence from Tokyo," Working Papers on Central Bank Communication 008, University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Economics.
    6. Leon Stirk-Wang & Paul Thorsnes, 2017. "Geographic variation in intra-city house price appreciation over the boom-bust cycle: evidence from Auckland, NZ," Working Papers 1714, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2017.
    7. Enwei Zhu & Jing Wu & Hongyu Liu & Xindian Li, 2022. "Within‐City Spatial Distribution, Heterogeneity and Diffusion of House Price: Evidence from a Spatiotemporal Index for Beijing," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 50(3), pages 621-655, September.
    8. Knut Are Aastveit & Bruno Albuquerque & André Anundsen, 2019. "Changing supply elasticities and regional housing booms," Working Paper 2019/8, Norges Bank.
    9. Begley, Jaclene & Chan, Sewin, 2018. "The effect of housing wealth shocks on work and retirement decisions," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 180-195.
    10. Edward L. Glaeser & Charles G. Nathanson, 2014. "Housing Bubbles," NBER Working Papers 20426, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Takaaki Ohnishi & Takayuki Mizuno & Tsutomu Watanabe, 2020. "House price dispersion in boom–bust cycles: evidence from Tokyo," The Japanese Economic Review, Springer, vol. 71(4), pages 511-539, October.
    12. Paul E. Carrillo & Erik Robert De Wit & William D. Larson, 2012. "Can Tightness in the Housing Market Help Predict Subsequent Home Price Appreciation? Evidence from the U.S. and the Netherlands," Working Papers 2012-11, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    13. Weida Kuang & Qilin Wang, 2018. "Cultural similarities and housing market linkage: evidence from OECD countries," Frontiers of Business Research in China, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-25, December.
    14. Takaaki Ohnishi & Takayuki Mizuno & Tsutomu Watanabe, 2019. "House Price Dispersion in Boom-Bust Cycles: Evidence from Tokyo," CARF F-Series CARF-F-461, Center for Advanced Research in Finance, Faculty of Economics, The University of Tokyo.
    15. Andreas Fuster & Benedict Guttman-Kenney & Andrew F. Haughwout, 2018. "Tracking and stress-testing U.S. household leverage," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue 24-1, pages 35-63.
    16. John Cotter & Stuart Gabriel & Richard Roll, 2012. "Can metropolitan housing risk be diversified? A cautionary tale from the recent boom and bust," Working Papers 201217, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    17. Paul E. Carrillo & Eric R. Wit & William Larson, 2015. "Can Tightness in the Housing Market Help Predict Subsequent Home Price Appreciation? Evidence from the United States and the Netherlands," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 43(3), pages 609-651, September.
    18. Katja Hanewald & Michael Sherris, 2013. "Postcode-Level House Price Models for Banking and Insurance Applications," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89(286), pages 411-425, September.
    19. Jing Wu & Yongheng Deng, 2015. "Intercity Information Diffusion and Price Discovery in Housing Markets: Evidence from Google Searches," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 289-306, April.
    20. Glaeser, Edward L. & Nathanson, Charles G., 2015. "Housing Bubbles," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: Gilles Duranton & J. V. Henderson & William C. Strange (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 0, pages 701-751, Elsevier.
    21. Joshua S. Graff Zivin & Yanjun Liao & Yann Panassie, 2020. "How Hurricanes Sweep Up Housing Markets: Evidence from Florida," NBER Working Papers 27542, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    22. Wen-Chi Liao & Daxuan Zhao & Li Ping Lim & Grace Khei Mie Wong, 2015. "Foreign liquidity to real estate market: Ripple effect and housing price dynamics," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 52(1), pages 138-158, January.

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