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Heterogeneity in Neighborhood-Level Price Growth in the United States, 1993-2009

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  • Fernando Ferreira
  • Joseph Gyourko

Abstract

Examination of detailed geographical information on U.S. housing transactions from 1993 to 2009 find much heterogeneity at the neighborhood level in when the recent boom began, how big the initial jumps in price growth were, how long the booms lasted, and what types of neighborhoods boomed first. There is less neighborhood-level heterogeneity in when the bust began and in aggregate price appreciation during the boom. This heterogeneity suggests that there was no one dominant cause of the boom. We also comment on how very local data may help understand the role of contagion, among other housing market phenomena.

Suggested Citation

  • Fernando Ferreira & Joseph Gyourko, 2012. "Heterogeneity in Neighborhood-Level Price Growth in the United States, 1993-2009," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 134-140, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:102:y:2012:i:3:p:134-40
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.102.3.134
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Card & Alexandre Mas & Jesse Rothstein, 2008. "Tipping and the Dynamics of Segregation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(1), pages 177-218.
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    Cited by:

    1. Glaeser, Edward L. & Nathanson, Charles G., 2015. "Housing Bubbles," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    2. Jing Wu & Yongheng Deng, 2015. "Intercity Information Diffusion and Price Discovery in Housing Markets: Evidence from Google Searches," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 289-306, April.
    3. John Cotter & Stuart Gabriel & Richard Roll, 2012. "Can Metropolitan Housing Risk be Diversified? A Cautionary Tale from the Recent Boom and Bust," Papers 1208.0371, arXiv.org.
    4. repec:eee:regeco:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:98-114 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Shao, Adam W. & Hanewald, Katja & Sherris, Michael, 2015. "Reverse mortgage pricing and risk analysis allowing for idiosyncratic house price risk and longevity risk," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 76-90.
    6. Paul E. Carrillo & Eric R. Wit & William Larson, 2015. "Can Tightness in the Housing Market Help Predict Subsequent Home Price Appreciation? Evidence from the United States and the Netherlands," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 43(3), pages 609-651, September.
    7. Edward L. Glaeser & Charles G. Nathanson, 2014. "Housing Bubbles," NBER Working Papers 20426, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Paul E. Carrillo & Erik Robert De Wit & William D. Larson, 2012. "Can Tightness in the Housing Market Help Predict Subsequent Home Price Appreciation? Evidence from the U.S. and the Netherlands," Working Papers 2012-11, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    9. Katja Hanewald & Michael Sherris, 2013. "Postcode-Level House Price Models for Banking and Insurance Applications," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89(286), pages 411-425, September.

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