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Math Skills and Labor-Market Outcomes: Evidence from a Resume-Based Field Experiment

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Abstract

We examine the link between math skills and labor-market outcomes using a resume-based field experiment. Specifically, we send fictitious resumes in response to online job postings, randomly assigning some resumes to indicate stronger math skills, and measure employer responses. The resumes that are randomly assigned to indicate stronger math skills receive more interest from employers than the comparison resumes. Our findings add to the body of evidence showing that stronger math skills positively affect labor-market outcomes.

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File URL: http://economics.missouri.edu/working-papers/2010/WP1013_koedel.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Missouri in its series Working Papers with number 1013.

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Length: 15 pgs.
Date of creation: 29 Oct 2010
Date of revision: 31 May 2011
Handle: RePEc:umc:wpaper:1013

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Keywords: Math skills; math skills and employment; math skills field experiment; math skills resume experiment.;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Aedin Doris & Donal O'Neill & Olive Sweetman, 2012. "Gender, Single-Sex Schooling and Maths Achievement," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n224-12.pdf, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
  2. Lounkaew, Kiatanantha, 2013. "Explaining urban–rural differences in educational achievement in Thailand: Evidence from PISA literacy data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 213-225.
  3. Torberg Falch & Ole Henning Nyhus & Bjarne Strom, 2013. "Causal effects of mathematics," Working Paper Series 15013, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  4. Torberg Falch & Ole Henning Nyhus & Bjarne Strøm, 2013. "Performance of Young Adults: The Importance of Different Skills," CESifo Working Paper Series 4124, CESifo Group Munich.

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