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The Benefit of Additional High-School Math and Science Classes for Young Men and Women

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Author Info

  • Levine, Phillip B
  • Zimmerman, David J

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of taking more high school math and science classes on wages, the likelihood of entering a technical job or a job traditional for one's sex, and the likelihood of choosing a technical college major or a major traditional for one's sex. Results from two data sets show that taking more high school math increases wages and increases the likelihood of entering technical and nontraditional fields for female college graduates. No significant impact from taking more high school math is consistently observed for other workers, and high school science courses have little effect on these outcomes.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Statistical Association in its journal Journal of Business and Economic Statistics.

Volume (Year): 13 (1995)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 137-49

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Handle: RePEc:bes:jnlbes:v:13:y:1995:i:2:p:137-49

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Cited by:
  1. Koedel, Cory & Tyhurst, Eric, 2012. "Math skills and labor-market outcomes: Evidence from a resume-based field experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 131-140.
  2. Light, Audrey, 1999. "High school employment, high school curriculum, and post-school wages," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 291-309, June.
  3. Thomas Downes & David Figlio, 1998. "School Finance Reforms, Tax Limits, and Student Performance: Do Reforms Level-Up or Dumb Down?," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 9805, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  4. Song, Moohoun & Orazem, Peter & Wohlgemuth, Darin, 2007. "The Role of Mathematical and Verbal Skills on the Returns to Graduate and Professional Education," Staff General Research Papers 12843, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  5. repec:lan:wpaper:4535 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Aughinbaugh, Alison, 2012. "The effects of high school math curriculum on college attendance: Evidence from the NLSY97," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 861-870.
  7. Juanna Schrøter Joensen & Helena Skyt Nielsen, 2009. "Is there a Causal Effect of High School Math on Labor Market Outcomes?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(1).
  8. Morin, Louis-Philippe, 2010. "Estimating the BenefiÂ…t of High School for College-Bound Students," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2010-3, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 30 Jan 2010.
  9. repec:lan:wpaper:4839 is not listed on IDEAS
  10. Nick Adnett & Peter Davies, 2005. "Competition between or within schools? Re-assessing school choice," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 109-121.
  11. C Dougherty, 2000. "Impact of Work Experience and Training in the Current and Previous Occupations on Earnings: Micro Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," CEP Discussion Papers dp0456, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  12. repec:lan:wpaper:4408 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Hall, Caroline, 2013. "Does more general education reduce the risk of future unemployment? Evidence from labor market experiences during the Great Recession," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2013:10, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  14. Song, Moohoun & Orazem, Peter, 2005. "Returns to Graduate and Professional Education: The Roles of Mathematical and Verbal Skills by Major," Staff General Research Papers 12432, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  15. Louis-Philippe Morin, 2010. "Estimating the Benefit of High School for College-Bound Students," Working Papers 1002E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
  16. Cortes, Kalena & Goodman, Joshua & Nomi, Takako, 2013. "Intensive Math Instruction and Educational Attainment: Long-Run Impacts of Double-Dose Algebra," Working Paper Series rwp13-009, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  17. G Johnes, 2003. "Curriculum," Working Papers 541985, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
  18. repec:lan:wpaper:4407 is not listed on IDEAS

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