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The Effect of High School Courses on Earnings

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  • Heather Rose

    (Public Policy Institute of California, San Diego)

  • Julian R. Betts

    (Public Policy Institute of California, University of California, San Diego)

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    Abstract

    We estimate the effect that six types of high school math courses have on students' earnings nearly a decade after graduation. We use High School and Beyond transcript data to differentiate courses at a more detailed level than in previous research. This enables us to show that more-advanced courses have larger effects than less-advanced ones. We also provide evidence that math courses can help close the earnings gap between students from low-income and middle-income families. Finally, by incorporating other academic subjects, we demonstrate how specific course combinations can explain the earnings premium related to an additional year of school. © 2004 President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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    File URL: http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1162/003465304323031076
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Review of Economics and Statistics.

    Volume (Year): 86 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 2 (May)
    Pages: 497-513

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    Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:86:y:2004:i:2:p:497-513

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    Cited by:
    1. Joensen, Juanna Schrøter & Nielsen, Helena Skyt, 2006. "Is there a Causal Effect of High School Math on Labor Market Outcomes?," IZA Discussion Papers 2357, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Meta Brown & Wilbert van der Klaauw & Jaya Wen & Basit Zafar, 2013. "Financial education and the debt behavior of the young," Staff Reports 634, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    3. Dylan Conger & Mark C. Long & Patrice Iatarola, 2009. "Explaining race, poverty, and gender disparities in advanced course-taking," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(4), pages 555-576.
    4. Ernest Berkhout & Peter Berkhout & Dinand Webbink, 2011. "The Effects of a Dutch High School Curriculum Reform on Performance in and After Higher Education," De Economist, Springer, vol. 159(1), pages 41-61, March.
    5. Cory Koedel & Eric Tyhurst, 2010. "Math Skills and Labor-Market Outcomes: Evidence from a Resume-Based Field Experiment," Working Papers 1013, Department of Economics, University of Missouri, revised 31 May 2011.
    6. Goodman, Joshua, 2012. "The Labor of Division: Returns to Compulsory Math Coursework," Working Paper Series rwp12-032, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    7. Will Dobbie & Roland G. Fryer, Jr., 2011. "Exam High Schools and Academic Achievement: Evidence from New York City," NBER Working Papers 17286, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Cecilia Speroni, 2011. "High School Dual Enrollment Programs: Are We Fast-Tracking Students Too Fast?," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 7288, Mathematica Policy Research.
    9. Cortes, Kalena & Goodman, Joshua & Nomi, Takako, 2013. "Intensive Math Instruction and Educational Attainment: Long-Run Impacts of Double-Dose Algebra," Working Paper Series rwp13-009, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    10. Hamermesh, Daniel S. & Donald, Stephen G., 2008. "The effect of college curriculum on earnings: An affinity identifier for non-ignorable non-response bias," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 144(2), pages 479-491, June.
    11. Pierre Lefebvre & Philip Merrigan & Matthieu Verstraete, 2008. "The Effects of School Quality and Family Functioning on Youth Math Scores: a Canadian Longitudinal Analysis," Cahiers de recherche 0822, CIRPEE.
    12. Eren,Ozkan & Henderson,J. Daniel, 2006. "The Impact of Homework on Student Achievement," Departmental Working Papers 0518, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics, revised 12 May 2006.
    13. Aughinbaugh, Alison, 2012. "The effects of high school math curriculum on college attendance: Evidence from the NLSY97," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 861-870.
    14. Leping, Kristian-Olari & Toomet, Ott, 2008. "Emerging ethnic wage gap: Estonia during political and economic transition," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 599-619, December.
    15. Popov, Sergey V. & Bernhardt, Dan, 2010. "University Competition, Grading Standards and Grade Inflation," MPRA Paper 26461, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Torberg Falch & Ole Henning Nyhus & Bjarne Strom, 2013. "Causal effects of mathematics," Working Paper Series 15013, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

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