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Employee Voice and Private Sector Workplace Outcomes in Britain, 1980-2004

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  • Alex Bryson

    ()

  • Gomez, R.
  • Kretschmer, T.
  • Willman, P.

Abstract

Non-union direct voice has replaced union representative voice as the primary avenue for employee voice in the British private sector. This paper provides a framework for examining the relationship between employee voice and workplace outcomes that explains this development. As exit-voice theory predicts, voice is associated with lower voluntary turnover, especially in the case of union voice. Union voice is also associated with greater workplace conflict and poorer productivity. Non-union voice is associated with better workplace financial performance than other voice regimes.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Institute of Economic and Social Research in its series NIESR Discussion Papers with number 329.

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Date of creation: Mar 2009
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Handle: RePEc:nsr:niesrd:329

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  1. Alex Bryson & P Willman, 2006. "Accounting for Collective Action: Resource Acquisition and Mobilization in British Unions," CEP Discussion Papers dp0768, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  2. Stephen Machin & Stephen Wood, 2005. "Human resource management as a substitute for trade unions in British workplaces," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 58(2), pages 201-218, January.
  3. David G. Blanchflower & Alex Bryson, 2010. "The Wage Impact of Trade Unions in the UK Public and Private Sectors," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 77(305), pages 92-109, 01.
  4. Sandra E. Black & Lisa M. Lynch, 2001. "How To Compete: The Impact Of Workplace Practices And Information Technology On Productivity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(3), pages 434-445, August.
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