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Human Capital Risk, Contract Enforcement, and the Macroeconomy

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  • Tom Krebs
  • Moritz Kuhn
  • Mark L. J. Wright

Abstract

We develop a macroeconomic model with physical and human capital, human capital risk, and limited contract enforcement. We show analytically that young (high-return) households are the most exposed to human capital risk and are also the least insured. We document this risk-insurance pattern in data on life-insurance drawn from the Survey of Consumer Finance. A calibrated version of the model can quantitatively account for the life-cycle variation of insurance observed in the US data and implies welfare costs of under-insurance for young households that are equivalent to a 4 percent reduction in lifetime consumption. A policy reform that makes consumer bankruptcy more costly leads to a substantial increase in the volume of credit and insurance.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 17714.

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Date of creation: Dec 2011
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17714

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Cited by:
  1. Moritz Kuhn & Sebastian Koehne, 2012. "Should unemployment insurance be asset-tested?," 2012 Meeting Papers, Society for Economic Dynamics 850, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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