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Econometric Methods for Research in Education

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  • Costas Meghir
  • Steven G. Rivkin

Abstract

This paper reviews some of the econometric methods that have been used in the economics of education. The focus is on understanding how the assumptions made to justify and implement such methods relate to the underlying economic model and the interpretation of the results. We start by considering the estimation of the returns to education both within the context of a dynamic discrete choice model inspired by Willis and Rosen (1979) and in the context of the Mincer model. We discuss the relationship between the econometric assumptions and economic behaviour. We then discuss methods that have been used in the context of assessing the impact of education quality, the teacher contribution to pupils' achievement and the effect of school quality on housing prices. In the process we also provide a summary of some of the main results in this literature.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 16003.

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Date of creation: May 2010
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Publication status: published as Econometric methods for research in education , (with St e ven Rivkin), IFS Worki ng Papers, Handbook of Education, Hanushek and Machin eds. , 2011
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16003

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  1. Keane, Michael P & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1997. "The Career Decisions of Young Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(3), pages 473-522, June.
  2. Daniel Aaronson & Lisa Barrow & William Sander, 2002. "Teachers and student achievement in the Chicago public high schools," Working Paper Series, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago WP-02-28, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  3. Weili Ding & Steven Lehrer, 2005. "Class Size and Student Achievement: Experimental Estimates of Who Benefits and Who Loses from Reductions," Working Papers, Queen's University, Department of Economics 1046, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  4. John Kennan & James R. Walker, 2011. "The Effect of Expected Income on Individual Migration Decisions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 79(1), pages 211-251, 01.
  5. Stephen Gibbons & Stephen Machin & Olmo Silva, 2012. "Valuing School Quality Using Boundary Discontinuities," CEE Discussion Papers, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE 0132, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  6. Patrick Bayer & Fernando Ferreira & Robert McMillan, 2007. "A Unified Framework for Measuring Preferences for Schools and Neighborhoods," NBER Working Papers 13236, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Cunha, Flavio & Heckman, James J. & Schennach, Susanne, 2010. "Estimating the Technology of Cognitive and Noncognitive Skill Formation," IZA Discussion Papers 4702, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Pedro Carneiro & James J. Heckman & Edward J. Vytlacil, 2009. "Evaluating Marginal Policy Changes and the Average Effect of Treatment for Individuals at the Margin," NBER Working Papers 15211, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Christopher Jepsen & Steven Rivkin, 2009. "Class Size Reduction and Student Achievement: The Potential Tradeoff between Teacher Quality and Class Size," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(1).
  10. Julie Berry Cullen & Brian A Jacob & Steven Levitt, 2006. "The Effect of School Choice on Participants: Evidence from Randomized Lotteries," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 74(5), pages 1191-1230, 09.
  11. Jesse Rothstein, 2009. "Student Sorting and Bias in Value-Added Estimation: Selection on Observables and Unobservables," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 4(4), pages 537-571, October.
  12. Douglas N. Harris & Tim R. Sass, 2009. "The effects of NBPTS-certified teachers on student achievement," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 55-80.
  13. Abbring, Jaap H. & Heckman, James J., 2007. "Econometric Evaluation of Social Programs, Part III: Distributional Treatment Effects, Dynamic Treatment Effects, Dynamic Discrete Choice, and General Equilibrium Policy Evaluation," Handbook of Econometrics, Elsevier, in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 72 Elsevier.
  14. Donghoon Lee, 2005. "An Estimable Dynamic General Equilibrium Model Of Work, Schooling, And Occupational Choice," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(1), pages 1-34, 02.
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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Meghir and Rivkin NBER - Econometric Methods for Research in Education
    by Liam Delaney in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2010-07-19 08:07:00
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Cited by:
  1. Gianfranco DE SIMONE, 2012. "Render unto primary the things which are primary's. Inherited and fresh learning divides in Italian lower secondary education," Departmental Working Papers, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano 2012-14, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  2. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Jha, Nikhil, 2013. "Educational Achievement and the Allocation of School Resources," IZA Discussion Papers 7551, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Zimmerman, Seth D., 2011. "The Returns to Four-Year College for Academically Marginal Students," IZA Discussion Papers 6107, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Bucarey, Alonso & Urzúa, Sergio, 2013. "El retorno económico de la educación media técnico profesional en Chile," Journal, Centro de Estudios Públicos, Centro de Estudios Públicos, vol. 0(129), pages 1-48.

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