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Food Availability and Food Entitlements during the Chinese Great Leap Forward Famine: A dynamic panel data analysis (In French)

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  • Matthieu CLEMENT (GREThA UMR CNRS 5113)

Abstract

The article aims at identifying socioeconomic factors which explain the Chinese famine of 1959-1961. The main hypothesis of this paper is that the radicalism of Great Leap Forward policies generated both a decline of agricultural output (availability problems) and the implementation of an inadequate food distribution policy which penalised rural populations (accessibility problems). An econometrical analysis with provincial panel data for the period 1954-1966 points out the role of bad political choices on the occurrence of the famine and confirms the simultaneous influence of food availability decline and food distribution issues on mortality rates.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée in its series Cahiers du GREThA with number 2010-03.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:grt:wpegrt:2010-03

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Keywords: Great Leap Froward; famine; food availability; entitlements; dynamic panel data models; generalized method of moments;

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  1. Riskin, Carl, 1998. "Seven questions about the Chinese famine of 1959-1961," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 111-124.
  2. Dennis Tao Yang, 2008. "China's Agricultural Crisis and Famine of 1959–1961: A Survey and Comparison to Soviet Famines," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 50(1), pages 1-29, March.
  3. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
  4. Chang, Gene Hsin & Wen, Guanzhong James, 1998. "Food availability versus consumption efficiency: causes of the Chinese famine," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 157-165.
  5. David Roodman, 2007. "A Note on the Theme of Too Many Instruments," Working Papers 125, Center for Global Development.
  6. Houser, Daniel & Sands, Barbara & Xiao, Erte, 2009. "Three parts natural, seven parts man-made: Bayesian analysis of China's Great Leap Forward demographic disaster," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 148-159, February.
  7. Wei Li & Dennis Tao Yang, 2005. "The Great Leap Forward: Anatomy of a Central Planning Disaster," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(4), pages 840-877, August.
  8. Ellman, Michael, 2000. "The 1947 Soviet Famine and the Entitlement Approach to Famines," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(5), pages 603-30, September.
  9. Chang, Gene Hsin & Wen, Guanzhong James, 1997. "Communal Dining and the Chinese Famine of 1958-1961," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 46(1), pages 1-34, October.
  10. Sen, Amartya, 1983. "Development: Which Way Now?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 93(372), pages 742-62, December.
  11. Cormac � Gr�Da, 2008. "The ripple that drowns? Twentieth-century famines in China and India as economic history-super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 61(s1), pages 5-37, 08.
  12. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
  13. Yang, Dali L. & Su, Fubing, 1998. "The politics of famine and reform in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 141-155.
  14. Lin, Justin Yifu & Yang, Dennis Tao, 1998. "On the causes of China's agricultural crisis and the great leap famine," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 125-140.
  15. Sen, Amartya K, 1977. "Starvation and Exchange Entitlements: A General Approach and Its Application to the Great Bengal Famine," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 1(1), pages 33-59, March.
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