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Peer effects in adolescent bodyweight: Evidence from rural China

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  • Loh, Chung-Ping A.
  • Li, Qiang
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Abstract

Peer effect is a potential determinant of individual weight gain that has drawn considerable attention recently. The presence of peer effect implies that policies targeted at changing bodyweight can have enhanced effectiveness through a multiplier effect.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

Volume (Year): 86 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 35-44

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Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:86:y:2013:i:c:p:35-44

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Keywords: Adolescent; Peer effects; BMI; China;

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References

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