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The effects of training on own and co-worker productivity: Evidence from a field experiment

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  • Andries de Grip
  • Jan Sauermann

Abstract

This paper analyses the effects of work-related training on worker productivity. To identify the causal effects from training, we combine a field experiment that randomly assigns workers to treatment and control groups with panel data on individual worker performance before and after training. We find that participation in the training programme leads to a 10 percent increase in performance. Moreover, we provide experimental evidence for externalities from treated workers on their untreated teammates: An increase of 10 percentage points in the share of treated peers leads to a performance increase of 0.51 percent. We provide evidence that the estimated effects are causal and not the result of employee selection into and out of training. Furthermore, we find that the performance increase is not due to lower quality provided by the worker.

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File URL: http://karlan.yale.edu/fieldexperiments/papers/00228.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The Field Experiments Website in its series Natural Field Experiments with number 00228.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:feb:natura:00228

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Web page: http://www.fieldexperiments.com

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  1. Konings, Jozef & Vanormelingen, Stijn, 2010. "The Impact of Training on Productivity and Wages: Firm Level Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 4731, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Breuer, Kathrin & Nieken, Petra & Sliwka, Dirk, 2010. "Social Ties and Subjective Performance Evaluations: An Empirical Investigation," IZA Discussion Papers 4913, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Lorraine Dearden & Howard Reed & John Van Reenen, 2005. "The impact of training on productivity and wages : evidence from British panel data," Economic History Working Papers 779, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  4. Jonathan Guryan & Kory Kroft & Matt Notowidigdo, 2007. "Peer Effects in the Workplace: Evidence from Random Groupings in Professional Golf Tournaments," NBER Working Papers 13422, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Thomas Zwick, 2003. "The Impact of ICT Investment on Establishment Productivity," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 184(1), pages 99-110, April.
  6. Orana Bandiera & Iwan Barankay & Imran Rasul, 2006. "Incentives for managers and inequality among workers: Evidence from a firm level experiment," Natural Field Experiments 00213, The Field Experiments Website.
  7. Bassanini, Andrea & Booth, Alison L. & Brunello, Giorgio & De Paola, Maria & Leuven, Edwin, 2005. "Workplace Training in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1640, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Schwerdt, Guido & Messer, Dolores & Woessmann, Ludger & Wolter, Stefan C., 2011. "Effects of Adult Education Vouchers on the Labor Market: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 5431, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Goux, Dominique & Maurin, Eric, 2000. "Returns to firm-provided training: evidence from French worker-firm matched data1," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 1-19, January.
  10. Edwin Leuven & Hessel Oosterbeek, 2008. "An alternative approach to estimate the wage returns to private-sector training," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(4), pages 423-434.
  11. Ann P. Bartel, 1995. "Training, Wage Growth and Job Performance: Evidence From a Company Database," NBER Working Papers 4027, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Daniel Parent, 2002. "Employer-Supported Training in Canada and Its Impact on Mobility and Wages," CIRANO Working Papers 2002s-27, CIRANO.
  13. Bartel, Ann P, 1995. "Training, Wage Growth, and Job Performance: Evidence from a Company Database," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(3), pages 401-25, July.
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Cited by:
  1. de Grip, Andries & Sauermann, Jan & Sieben, Inge, 2011. "The Role of Peers in Estimating Tenure-Performance Profiles: Evidence from Personnel Data," IZA Discussion Papers 6164, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. repec:dgr:umaror:2011014 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. repec:dgr:umamet:2011052 is not listed on IDEAS

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