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The Currency and Financial Crisis in Southeast Asia: A Case of 'Sudden Death' or Death Foretold'?

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  • Ramkishen Rajan

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Abstract

Almost all existing studies on the causes, consequences and policy implications of the economic and financial crisis faced by East Asia have provided only a cursory discussion of broad data at best, or have fallen into the trap of merely stating the weaknesses in the economies as a ‘matter of fact’ at worst. Ex-post facto analysis is of little value. In this paper, limiting our focus to the Southeast Asian economies (viz. Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and the Philippines), we carefully scrutinise the available economic data in a systematic manner, with a view to determining whether there were possible indications of discernible deterioration in economic ‘fundamentals’ that might have been indicative of an impending crisis. In other words, we aim to determine whether the crisis was a ‘death foretold’ (i.e. ‘an accident waiting to happen’) as most observers seem to assume, or a quick and ‘sudden death’ as Sachs et al. (1996b) have suggested of the Mexican crisis of 1994- 95. We take pains to focus solely on the policies/factors that seemed to have a direct impact on the crisis. To get a sense of proper prospective, both trends in the various indicators of the Southeast Asian economies from 1990 to 1996 (just prior to the onset of the crisis in mid-1997) is considered, as well as compare their performance to the Latin American economies of Argentina, Brazil and Mexico.[Working Paper No.1]

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:2583.

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Date of creation: Jun 2010
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Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2583

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Keywords: East Asia; implications; economic; financial; Indonesia; Malaysia; Thailand; Philippines;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Anisha Sabhlok, 2010. "The Evolution of Singapore Business: A Case Study Approach," Working Papers id:2717, eSocialSciences.
  2. Ramkishen Rajan, 2010. "Sand in the Wheels of International Finance: Revisiting the Debate in Light of the East Asian Mayhem," Working Papers id:2686, eSocialSciences.
  3. Anisha Sabhlok, 2010. "The Evolution of Singapore Business: A Case Study Approach," Working Papers id:2818, eSocialSciences.
  4. Ramkishen S. Rajan & Chang Li Lin, 2010. "Regional Responses To The Southeast Asian Economic Crisis: A Case Of Self-Help Or No Help?," Working Papers id:2685, eSocialSciences.

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