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Gender Gap in Admission Performance under Competitive Pressure

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  • Stepan Jurajda
  • Daniel Munich

Abstract

Do women perform worse than equally able men in stressful competitive settings? We ask this question for competitions with a high payoff---admissions to tuition-free selective universities. With data on an entire cohort of Czech students graduating from secondary schools and applying to universities, we show that, compared to men of similar general skills and subject-of-study preferences, women do not shy away from applying to more competitive programs and perform similarly well when competition is less intense, but perform substantially worse (are less likely to be admitted) when applying to very selective universities. This comparison holds even when controlling for unobservable skills

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague in its series CERGE-EI Working Papers with number wp371.

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Date of creation: Nov 2008
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Handle: RePEc:cer:papers:wp371

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Related research

Keywords: Gender Gap in Performance; Test Anxiety; Competition; Admissions.;

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References

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  1. Joseph Price, 2008. "Gender Differences in the Response to Competition," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 61(3), pages 320-333, April.
  2. Marie-Claire Villeval & Nabanita Datta Gupta & Anders Poulsen, 2005. "Male and Female Competitive Behavior - Experimental Evidence," Working Papers, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure 0512, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure.
  3. Luigi Guiso & Paola Sapienza & Luigi Zingales, 2007. "Social Capital as Good Culture," NBER Working Papers 13712, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Stepan Jurajda & Teodora Paligorova, 2006. "Female Managers and Their Wages in Central Europe," CERGE-EI Working Papers, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague wp296, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague.
  5. Nekby, Lena & Thoursie, Peter Skogman & Vahtrik, Lars, 2008. "Gender and self-selection into a competitive environment: Are women more overconfident than men?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 100(3), pages 405-407, September.
  6. Jacobs, Bas & van der Ploeg, Frederick, 2005. "Guide to Reform of Higher Education: A European Perspective," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 5327, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Victor Lavy, 2008. "Gender Differences in Market Competitiveness in a Real Workplace: Evidence from Performance-based Pay Tournaments among Teachers," NBER Working Papers 14338, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Muriel Niederle & Lise Vesterlund, 2007. "Do Women Shy Away from Competition? Do Men Compete Too Much?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 122(3), pages 1067-1101, 08.
  9. Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2003. "Cluster-Sample Methods in Applied Econometrics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 133-138, May.
  10. Uri Gneezy & Muriel Niederle & Aldo Rustichini, 2003. "Performance In Competitive Environments: Gender Differences," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 118(3), pages 1049-1074, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Frick, Bernd, 2011. "Gender differences in competitiveness: Empirical evidence from professional distance running," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 389-398, June.

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