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Information Technology, Organization, and Productivity in the Public Sector: Evidence from Police Departments

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  • Luis Garicano
  • Paul Heaton

Abstract

We examine how information technology (IT) contributes to organizational change, labor demand, and improved productivity in the public sector using a new panel data set of police departments covering 1987-2003. While IT adoption is associated with increased administrative and organizational complexity and use of more highly educated officers, IT itself does not appear to enhance crimefighting effectiveness. These results are robust to various methods for controlling for agency-level characteristics and the endogeneity of IT use. IT investments do, however, appear to improve police productivity when complemented with particular management practices-in this case, those associated with the Compstat program.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp0826.

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Date of creation: Oct 2007
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Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0826

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Web page: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP

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Keywords: information technology; management practices; skills; productivity; police;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Garicano, Luis, 2010. "Policemen, managers, lawyers: New results on complementarities between organization and information and communication technology," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 355-358, July.
  2. Bartolucci, Cristian & Devicienti, Francesco, 2013. "Better Workers Move to Better Firms: A Simple Test to Identify Sorting," IZA Discussion Papers 7601, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Coviello, Decio & Ichino, Andrea & Persico, Nicola, 2010. "Don’t Spread Yourself Too Thin. The Impact of Task Juggling on Workers' Speed of Job Completion," CEPR Discussion Papers 8085, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Wenya Cheng & John Morrow & Kitjawat Tacharoen, 2013. "Productivity As If Space Mattered: An Application to Factor Markets Across China," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 1320, Economics, The University of Manchester.
  5. Leandro N. Carrera & Patrick Dunleavy & Simon Bastow, 2009. "Understanding productivity trends in UK tax collection," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 25532, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  6. Ginger Zhe Jin & Jungmin Lee, 2013. "Inspection Technology, Detection and Compliance: Evidence from Florida Restaurant Inspections," NBER Working Papers 18939, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Chad Syverson, 2010. "What Determines Productivity?," NBER Working Papers 15712, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Paolo Seri & Antonello Zanfei, 2012. "The Co-evolution of ICT, Skills and Organization in Public Administrations: Evidence from new European country-level data," Working Papers 1217, University of Urbino Carlo Bo, Department of Economics, Society & Politics - Scientific Committee - L. Stefanini & G. Travaglini, revised 2012.
  9. Soares, Rodrigo R. & Viveiros, Igor, 2010. "Organization and Information in the Fight against Crime: An Evaluation of the Integration of Police Forces in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil," IZA Discussion Papers 5270, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Alexander C. Lembcke, 2014. "Home Computers and Married Women's Labor Supply," CEP Discussion Papers dp1260, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

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