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The Impact of Information Technology on Emergency Health Care Outcomes

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  • Susan Athey
  • Scott Stern
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    Abstract

    We analyze the productivity of information technology in emergency response systems. ``Enhanced 911" (E911) is information technology that links caller identification to a location database and so speeds up emergency response. We assess the impact of E911 on health outcomes using Pennsylvania ambulance and hospital records between 1994 and 1996, a period of substantial adoption. We find that as a result of E911 adoption, patient health measured at the time of ambulance arrival improves, suggesting that E911 speeds up emergency response. Further analysis using hospital discharge data shows that E911 reduces mortality and hospital costs.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by The RAND Corporation in its journal RAND Journal of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 33 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 3 (Autumn)
    Pages: 399-432

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    Handle: RePEc:rje:randje:v:33:y:2002:i:autumn:p:399-432

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    Cited by:
    1. Ajay K. Agrawal & Avi Goldfarb, 2006. "Restructuring Research: Communication Costs and the Democratization of University Innovation," NBER Working Papers 12812, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Ferreira, Susana & Hamilton, Kirk & Vincent, Jeffrey R., 2011. "Nature, socioeconomics and adaptation to natural disasters: new evidence from floods," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5725, The World Bank.
    3. Jonathan C. Javitt & James B. Rebitzer & Lonny Reisman, 2007. "Information Technology and Medical Missteps: Evidence from a Randomized Trial," NBER Working Papers 13493, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Ann Bartel & Casey Ichniowski & Kathryn Shaw & Ricardo Correa, 2007. "International Differences in the Adoption and Impact of New Information Technologies and New HR Practices: The Valve-Making Industry in the U.S. and U.K," NBER Working Papers 13651, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Steven Stern & Elizabeth Merwin & Emily Hauenstein & Ivora Hinton & Virgina Rovnyak & Melvin Wilson & Ishan Williams & Irma Mahone, 2008. "The E¤ect of Rurality on Mental and Physical Health," Virginia Economics Online Papers 381, University of Virginia, Department of Economics.
    6. Mirko Draca & Raffaella Sadun & John Van Reenen, 2006. "Productivity and ICT: a review of the evidence," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4561, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Ann P. Bartel & Casey Ichniowski & Kathryn L. Shaw, 2005. "How Does Information Technology Really Affect Productivity? Plant-Level Comparisons of Product Innovation, Process Improvement and Worker Skills," NBER Working Papers 11773, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Jason Chan & Anindya Ghose, 2012. "Internet's Dirty Secret: Assessing the Impact of Online Intermediaries on the Outbreak of Sexually Transmitted Diseases," Working Papers 12-07, NET Institute, revised Sep 2012.
    9. Martin Carree & Boris Lokshin & René Belderbos, 2011. "A note on testing for complementarity and substitutability in the case of multiple practices," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 263-269, June.

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