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Technology Innovations, Organisational Changes and Firms’ Wages in Italy

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  • Paolo Ghinetti

    ()
    (SEMEQ Department - Faculty of Economics - University of Eastern Piedmont)

Abstract

This paper uses longitudinal data for a sample of Italian firms to study the effects of technological and organisational changes on wage levels and on wage differentials by skills inside the firm. Fixed effect estimates reveal that technological changes are associated with higher absolute and relative wages for skilled workers. About organisational changes, initially their relationship with firms’ wages is negative, but it becomes positive in subsequent periods, especially for skilled workers. Finally, there is no evidence that the wage increase is higher when technological and organisational changes are adopted in conjunction instead of separately.

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File URL: http://semeq.unipmn.it/files/Quaderno%2020.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by SEMEQ Department - Faculty of Economics - University of Eastern Piedmont in its series Working Papers with number 111.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:upo:upopwp:111

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Keywords: Information technology; organisational change; wages; Italy;

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  8. Katz, Lawrence F. & Autor, David H., 1999. "Changes in the wage structure and earnings inequality," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 26, pages 1463-1555 Elsevier.
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  19. repec:rie:review:v:8:y:2003:i:2:n:7 is not listed on IDEAS
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