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Butter, Guns And Ice-Cream Theory And Evidence From Sub-Saharan Africa

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Author Info

  • Raul Caruso

Abstract

This paper is intended to complement the existing literature on civil wars. First, it presents a simple theoretical model of conflict that defines a two-sector economy. In a contested sector, two agents struggle to appropriate the maximum possible fraction of a contestable output. In an uncontested sector, they hold secure property rights over the production of some goods. Agents split their resource endowment between 'butter', 'guns' and 'ice-cream'. Following the theoretical insights the empirical analysis focuses on the relationship between civil wars and different sectors of the economy. In particular, a panel probit specification shows that the incidence of a civil war decreases in the size of manufacturing sector.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Defence and Peace Economics.

Volume (Year): 21 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 269-283

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Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:21:y:2010:i:3:p:269-283

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Related research

Keywords: Civil war; Resource curse; Butter; guns and ice-cream; Structure of the economy; Panel probit analysis;

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Cited by:
  1. Domingues Patrick, 2011. "A Database on the Mozambican Civil War," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 17(1), pages 1-32, May.
  2. Raul Caruso, 2012. "Differentials in property Rights in a two-sector economy," Revue d'├ęconomie politique, Dalloz, vol. 122(2), pages 257-278.
  3. Brauer, Jurgen & Caruso, Raul, 2011. "Peace economists and peace economics," MPRA Paper 34927, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Vincenzo Bove & Georgios Efthyvoulou, 2013. "Political Cycles in Public Expenditure: Butter vs. Guns," Working Papers 2013016, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  5. Caruso Raul, 2011. "On the Nature of Peace Economics," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(2), pages 1-13, January.
  6. Raul Caruso & Ilaria Petrarca & Roberto Ricciuti, 2014. "Spatial Concentration of Military Dictatorships in Sub-Saharan Africa (1977-2007)," CESifo Working Paper Series 4802, CESifo Group Munich.
  7. Raul Caruso & Ilaria Petrarca & Roberto Ricciuti, 2012. "The Diffusion of Military Dictatorships," Working Papers 35/2012, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
  8. Raul Caruso & Jacopo Costa & Roberto Ricciuti, 2011. "The probability of military rule in Africa, 1970-2007," Working Papers 2011/26, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  9. Caruso Raul, 2010. "International Relative Prices and Civil Wars in Africa: A Note," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 1-8, June.
  10. Balestri Sara, 2012. "Gold and Civil Conflict Intensity: evidence from a spatially disaggregated analysis," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 18(3), pages 1-7, December.
  11. Caruso, Raul & Petrarca , Ilaria & Ricciuti, Roberto, 2013. "Is there a Diffusion of Military Regimes in Sub-Saharan Africa? Empirical Evidence in the Period 1972-2007," NEPS Working Papers 4/2013, Network of European Peace Scientists.

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