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Optimal Design of Intergovernmental Grants Under Asymmetric Information

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  • Bernd Huber

    ()

  • Marco Runkel

    ()

Abstract

This paper develops a theoretical explanation why it may be optimal for higher-level governments to pay categorical block grants or closed-ended matching grants to local governments. We consider a federation with two types of local governments which differ in the cost of providing public goods. The federal government redistributes between jurisdictions, but cannot observe the type of a jurisdiction. In this asymmetric information setting, it is shown that the second-best optimum can be implemented with the help of categorical block grants and closed-ended matching grants, but not with unconditional block grants or open-ended matching grants. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10797-006-1405-3
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal International Tax and Public Finance.

Volume (Year): 13 (2006)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 25-41

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Handle: RePEc:kap:itaxpf:v:13:y:2006:i:1:p:25-41

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=102915

Related research

Keywords: asymmetric information; categorical block grants; closed-ended matching grants;

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References

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  1. Baretti, Christian & Huber, Bernd & Lichtblau, Karl, 2002. "A Tax on Tax Revenue: The Incentive Effects of Equalizing Transfers: Evidence from Germany," Munich Reprints in Economics 20129, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  2. Massimo Bordignon & Paolo Manasse & Guido Tabellini, . "Optimal Regional Redistribution Under Asymmetric Information," Working Papers 93, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  3. Lockwood, Ben, 1997. "Inter-Regional Insurance," Discussion Papers 9703, Exeter University, Department of Economics.
  4. Horst Raff & John Wilson, 1997. "Income Redistribution with Well-Informed Local Governments," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 407-427, November.
  5. Wallace E. Oates, 1999. "An Essay on Fiscal Federalism," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(3), pages 1120-1149, September.
  6. Richard C. Cornes & Emilson C. D. Silva, 2003. "Public Good Mix in a Federation with Incomplete Information," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 5(2), pages 381-397, 04.
  7. BUCOVETSKY, Sam & MARCHAND, Maurice & PESTIEAU, Pierre, . "Tax competition and revelation of preferences for public expenditure," CORE Discussion Papers RP -1352, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  8. Bev Dahlby, 1996. "Fiscal externalities and the design of intergovernmental grants," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 3(3), pages 397-412, July.
  9. Bird, Richard M. & Smart, Michael, 2002. "Intergovernmental Fiscal Transfers: International Lessons for Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 899-912, June.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Herold, Katharina, 2009. "Intergovernmental grants and financial autonomy under asymmetric information," FiFo Discussion Papers - Finanzwissenschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 09-2, University of Cologne, FiFo Institute for Public Economics.
  2. Levaggi, Rosella, 2010. "From local to global public goods: How should externalities be represented?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1040-1042, September.
  3. Faber, Riemer & Koning, Pierre, 2012. "Why Not Fully Spend a Conditional Block Grant?," IZA Discussion Papers 6712, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Bernd Huber & Marco Runkel, 2005. "Interregional Redistribution and Budget Institutions under Asymmetric Information," CESifo Working Paper Series 1491, CESifo Group Munich.
  5. Allers, Maarten A. & Toolsema, Linda A., 2012. "Welfare financing: Grant allocation and efficiency," Research Report 12004-EEF, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
  6. Geys, Benny & Konrad, Kai A., 2010. "Federalism and optimal allocation across levels of governance," Discussion Papers, Research Professorship & Project "The Future of Fiscal Federalism" SP II 2010-09, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
  7. Billy Jack, 2003. "Comparing the distortionary effects of alternative in-kind intergovernmental transfers," Working Papers gueconwpa~03-03-17, Georgetown University, Department of Economics.

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