Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Has the Bologna reform enhanced the employability of graduates? Early evidence from Slovenia

Contents:

Author Info

  • Daša Farcnik
  • Polona Domadenik
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the school-to-work transition of graduates in different fields of study, as well as to study programmes in three subsequent generations of graduates in the 2007 to 2009 period. The paper focuses on graduates from the new Bologna-harmonised programmes and investigates their early career outcomes by comparing them to those of graduates from pre-harmonised programmes. Design/methodology/approach – The authors apply a probit regression to calculate differences in the probability of employment for different fields of study and propensity score matching to investigate the effect of different study programmes in each field of education on early career outcomes, such as being employed within the first three months of graduation and the first nine months of graduation. Findings – The authors find that graduating from a particular field of study affects the probability of employment in all three years. In general, regardless of the field, the authors observe decreasing probabilities of employment in 2008 and 2009. Using propensity score matching, the authors estimate the effect of the new Bologna-harmonised programmes on the probability of employment and find a statistically significant negative effect compared to counterparts who finished pre-Bologna programmes. The findings are robust to the use of different matching criteria. Practical implications – In the institutional framework of a tuition-free system in higher education and collective bargaining in the labour market, performance indicators such as employability can provide relevant information regarding student choice and a proxy measure for the quality of higher education in each participating university. In addition, this provides a rare insight into the employability of graduates from Bologna-harmonised programmes, as well as for a post-transition country such as Slovenia. Originality/value – By covering entire populations of full-time graduates in 2007, 2008 and 2009 who entered the labour market for the first time after graduation, the authors calculate the probability of employment within the first three and nine months of graduation. This allows the authors to infer about the effect of the new Bologna-harmonised programmes as well as the impact of the recent financial crisis. The paper offers rare evidence of the school-to-work transition in a post-transition and tuition-free country.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0143-7720&volume=33&issue=1&articleid=17021511&show=abstract
    Download Restriction: Cannot be freely downloaded

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Emerald Group Publishing in its journal International Journal of Manpower.

    Volume (Year): 33 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 1 (June)
    Pages: 51-75

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:eme:ijmpps:v:33:y:2012:i:1:p:51-75

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.emeraldinsight.com

    Order Information:
    Postal: Emerald Group Publishing, Howard House, Wagon Lane, Bingley, BD16 1WA, UK
    Email:
    Web: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/ijm.htm

    Related research

    Keywords: Bologna declaration; Employability; Employment; Graduates; Human capital; Qualifications; School-to-work transition; Slovenia;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. James, Estelle, et al, 1989. "College Quality and Future Earnings: Where Should You Send Your Child to College?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(2), pages 247-52, May.
    2. A N Nguyen & J Taylor, 2005. "From school to first job: a longitudinal analysis," Working Papers 565907, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    3. Arcidiacono, Peter, 2004. "Ability sorting and the returns to college major," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 343-375.
    4. Elish Kelly & Philip O'Connell & Emer Smyth, 2008. "The Economic Returns to Field of Study and Competencies Among Higher Education Graduates in Ireland," Papers WP242, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    5. Lassibille, Gerard & Navarro Gomez, Lucia & Aguilar Ramos, Isabel & de la O Sanchez, Carolina, 2001. "Youth transition from school to work in Spain," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 139-149, April.
    6. World Demographic and Ageing Forum & David Bell & Alison Bowes & Axel Heitmueller, 2007. "Did the Introduction of Free Personal Care in Scotland in a Reduction of Informal Care?," Journal Article y:2007:i:1, World Demographic and Ageing Forum.
    7. Quintini, Glenda & Martin, John P. & Martin, Sébastien, 2007. "The Changing Nature of the School-to-Work Transition Process in OECD Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 2582, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. L. Biggeri & M. Bini & L. Grilli, 2001. "The transition from university to work: a multilevel approach to the analysis of the time to obtain the first job," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 164(2), pages 293-305.
    9. Heckman, James J & Ichimura, Hidehiko & Todd, Petra E, 1997. "Matching as an Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 605-54, October.
    10. Stacy Berg Dale & Alan B. Krueger, 1999. "Estimating the Payoff to Attending a More Selective College: An Application of Selection on Observables and Unobservables," NBER Working Papers 7322, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. repec:lan:wpaper:1062 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Pastore, Francesco, 2007. "Employment and Education Policy for Young People in the EU: What Can New Member States Learn from Old Member States?," IZA Discussion Papers 3209, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Black, Dan A. & Smith, J.A.Jeffrey A., 2004. "How robust is the evidence on the effects of college quality? Evidence from matching," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 99-124.
    14. Wolfgang Franz & Joachim Inkmann & Winfried Pohlmeier & Volker Zimmermann, 2000. "Young and Out in Germany (On Youths? Chances of Labor Market Entrance in Germany)," NBER Chapters, in: Youth Employment and Joblessness in Advanced Countries, pages 381-426 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Machin, Stephen & Puhani, Patrick A., 2003. "Subject of degree and the gender wage differential: evidence from the UK and Germany," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 79(3), pages 393-400, June.
    16. Blakemore, Arthur E & Low, Stuart A, 1984. "Sex Differences in Occupational Selection: The Case of College Majors," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(1), pages 157-63, February.
    17. Eric Eide, 1994. "College Major Choice And Changes In The Gender Wage Gap," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 12(2), pages 55-64, 04.
    18. Hwei-Lin Chuang, 1999. "Estimating the determinants of the unemployment duration for college graduates in Taiwan," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(10), pages 677-681.
    19. Anh Ngoc Nguyen & Jim Taylor & Steve Bradley, 2006. "The Estimated Effect Of Catholic Schooling On Educational Outcomes Using Propensity Score Matching," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(4), pages 285-307, October.
    20. Joseph G. Altonji & Thomas A. Dunn, . "Using Siblings to Estimate the Effect of School Quality on Wages," IPR working papers 96-10, Institute for Policy Resarch at Northwestern University.
    21. McGinnity, Frances & Russell, Helen & Williams, James & Blackwell, Sylvia, 2005. "Time Use in Ireland 2005: Survey Report," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BMI183.
    22. Sascha O. Becker & Andrea Ichino, 2002. "Estimation of average treatment effects based on propensity scores," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 2(4), pages 358-377, November.
    23. Smith, Jeremy & McKnight, Abigail & Naylor, Robin, 2000. "Graduate Employability: Policy and Performance in Higher Education in the UK," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(464), pages F382-411, June.
    24. Caroline M. Hoxby, 1997. "How the Changing Market Structure of U.S. Higher Education Explains College Tuition," NBER Working Papers 6323, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    25. LaLonde, Robert J, 1986. "Evaluating the Econometric Evaluations of Training Programs with Experimental Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(4), pages 604-20, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eme:ijmpps:v:33:y:2012:i:1:p:51-75. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jade Turvey).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.