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What Policies will Reduce Gender Schooling Gaps in Developing Countries: Evidence and Interpretation

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  • Glick, Peter
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    Abstract

    Summary This paper considers evidence for the effects of policies on gender gaps in education, distinguishing between policies that are ostensibly gender neutral and those that explicitly target girls. The demand for girls' schooling is often more responsive than boys' to gender neutral changes in school distance, price, and quality, patterns which can be explained in a human capital investment model through assumptions about girls' and boys' schooling costs and returns. Among policies that target girls' enrollments, price incentives to households or schools and the provision of female teachers appear to be effective. Other interventions hold promise but have not been the subject of rigorous evaluation, pointing to an important agenda for future research.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

    Volume (Year): 36 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 9 (September)
    Pages: 1623-1646

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:36:y:2008:i:9:p:1623-1646

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

    Related research

    Keywords: education gender human capital investments;

    References

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    Cited by:
    1. Lincove, Jane Arnold, 2012. "The influence of price on school enrollment under Uganda's policy of free primary education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 799-811.
    2. Dickerson, Andy & McIntosh, Steven & Valente, Christine, 2013. "Do the Maths: An Analysis of the Gender Gap in Mathematics in Africa," IZA Discussion Papers 7174, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Kirdar, Murat G. & Dayioglu-Tayfur, Meltem & Koc, Ismet, 2014. "Does Longer Compulsory Education Equalize Schooling by Gender and Rural/Urban Residence?," IZA Discussion Papers 7939, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Andy Dickerson & Steven McIntosh & Christine Valente, . "Do The Maths: An Analysis Of The Gender Gap In Mathematics In AfricaAbstract: This paper uses microdata for 19 African countries to examine the gender difference in maths test scores amongst primary s," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 13/300, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

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