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Can Private School Subsidies Increase Enrollment for the Poor? The Quetta Urban Fellowship Program

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  • Kim, Jooseop
  • Alderman, Harold
  • Orazem, Peter F

Abstract

This study evaluates a program designed to stimulate girls' schooling through the creation of private girls' schools in poor urban neighborhoods of Quetta, Pakistan. Enrollment growth in these randomly selected neighborhoods is compared to enrollment growth in otherwise similar neighborhoods that were randomly assigned to a control group. The analysis indicates that the program increased girls' enrollment around 33 percentage points. Boys' enrollment rose as well, partly because boys were allowed to attend the new schools and partly because parents would not send their girls to school without also educating their boys. This outcome suggests that programs targeted at girls can also induce parents to invest more in their boys. The success of the program varied across neighborhoods, although success was not clearly related to the relative wealth of a neighborhood or to parents' level of education. Thus the program offers tremendous promise for increasing enrollment rates in other poor urban areas. Copyright 1999 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by World Bank Group in its journal World Bank Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 13 (1999)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 443-65

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Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:13:y:1999:i:3:p:443-65

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Cited by:
  1. Khandker, Shahidur & Pitt, Mark & Fuwa, Nobuhiko, 2003. "Subsidy to Promote Girls' Secondary Education: The Female Stipend Program in Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 23688, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Andrabi, Tahir & Das, Jishnu & Khwaja, Asim Ijaz, 2011. "Students today, teachers tomorrow ? identifying constraints on the provision of Education," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5674, The World Bank.
  3. Wendy Janssens, 2005. "Measuring Externalities in Program Evaluation," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-017/2, Tinbergen Institute, revised 30 Mar 2006.
  4. Olivia D’Aoust & Olivier Sterck & Philip Verwimp, 2013. "Buying Peace: The Mirage of Demobilizing Rebels," HiCN Working Papers 145, Households in Conflict Network.
  5. World Bank, 2002. "Poverty Assessment : Poverty in Pakistan - Vulnerabilities, Social Caps, and Rural Dynamics," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15335, The World Bank.
  6. Jere R. Behrman & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2005. "Does Increasing Women's Schooling Raise the Schooling of the Next Generation? Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(5), pages 1745-1751, December.
  7. Mohammad Niaz Asadullah, . "Returns to Private and Public Education in Bangladesh and Pakistan: A Comparative Analysis," QEH Working Papers qehwps167, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
  8. Banerjee, Ritwik & King, Elizabeth M. & Orazem, Peter & Paterno, Elizabeth M., 2010. "Student and Teacher Attendance: The Role of Shared Goods in Reducing Absenteeism," Staff General Research Papers 32167, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  9. Behrman, Jere R. & Ross, David & Sabot, Richard, 2008. "Improving quality versus increasing the quantity of schooling: Estimates of rates of return from rural Pakistan," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1-2), pages 94-104, February.
  10. Alderman, Harold, 2007. "Improving Nutrition through Community Growth Promotion: Longitudinal Study of the Nutrition and Early Child Development Program in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 1376-1389, August.
  11. Margaret Grosh & Carlo del Ninno & Emil Tesliuc & Azedine Ouerghi, 2008. "For Protection and Promotion : The Design and Implementation of Effective Safety Nets," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6582, August.
  12. Cynthia B. Lolyd, 2004. "The Changing Transitions to Adulthood in a Comparative Perspective: the Case of Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 43(4), pages 441-467.
  13. Glick, Peter, 2008. "What Policies will Reduce Gender Schooling Gaps in Developing Countries: Evidence and Interpretation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 1623-1646, September.
  14. David K. Evans & Arkadipta Ghosh, 2008. "Prioritizing Educational Investments in Children in the Developing World," Working Papers 587, RAND Corporation Publications Department.
  15. Domingues, Patrick, 2011. "Civil War Exposure And School Enrolment:Evidence From The Mozambican Civil War," NEPS Working Papers 1/2011, Network of European Peace Scientists.
  16. Raymond, Melanie & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 2001. "The Impact Of Educational Grants On Basic Education Completion: Do The Poor Benefit?," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20585, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  17. Richard J. Murnane & Alejandro J. Ganimian, 2014. "Improving Educational Outcomes in Developing Countries: Lessons from Rigorous Evaluations," NBER Working Papers 20284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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