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Why Governments Should Invest More to Educate Girls

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  • T. Paul Schultz

    ()
    (Economic Growth Center, Yale University)

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    Abstract

    Women and men often receive the same percentage increase in their wage rates with advances in schooling. Because these returns decline with more schooling, the marginal returns for women will tend to exceed those for men, especially in countries where women are much less educated. The health and schooling of children are more closely related to their mother's education than father's. More educated women work more hours in the market labor force, broadening the tax base and thereby potentially reducing tax distortions. These three conditions, it is argued, justify the disproportionate allocation of public expenditures toward women's education.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Economic Growth Center, Yale University in its series Working Papers with number 836.

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    Length: 46 pages
    Date of creation: Sep 2001
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:egc:wpaper:836

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    Related research

    Keywords: Gender; Returns; Education; Development; Externalities; Taxes;

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    Cited by:
    1. Priya Bhagowalia & Susan E. Chen & William A. Masters, 2008. "The Distribution Of Child Nutritional Status Across Countries And Over Time," Working Papers 08-04, Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics.
    2. Peter Glick & François Roubaud, 2004. "Export Processing Zone Expansion in an African Country: What are the Labor Market and Gender Impacts?," Working Papers DT/2004/15, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation), revised Dec 2004.
    3. Sinha, Nistha & Yoong, Joanne, 2009. "Long-term financial incentives and investment in daughters : evidence from conditional cash transfers in north India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4860, The World Bank.
    4. Enrique Aldaz Carroll & Ricardo Morán, 2001. "Escaping the Poverty Trap in Latin America: The Role of Family Factors," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 38(114), pages 155-190.
    5. Try, Sverre, 2005. "The use of job search strategies among university graduates," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 223-243, March.

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