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Are most people consequentialists?

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  • Johansson-Stenman, Olof

Abstract

Welfare economics relies on consequentialism even though many philosophers have questioned this assumption. Survey evidence, based on a representative sample in Sweden, is presented here suggesting that most people’s ethical perceptions are consistent with consequentialism.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 115 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 225-228

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:115:y:2012:i:2:p:225-228

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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Keywords: Ethics; Rights; Consequentialism; Cost-benefit analysis; Experimental philosophy;

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