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Adoption of organic farming: Are there differences between early and late adoption?

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  • Läpple, Doris
  • Rensburg, Tom Van
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    Abstract

    Based on the fact that not all farmers adopt a technology at the same time, it is argued in this paper that the distinction between groups is important because early, medium and late adopters respond differently to economic and non-economic factors when they consider whether to take up organic farming or not. The individual effects on adoption between the groups are identified by the use of multinomial logit analysis. The results provide evidence that there are significant differences in the characteristics between the adopter groups. The findings also reveal that the factors that affect adoption play a different role for early, medium and late adopters, particularly with regard to farming intensity, age, information gathering as well as attitudes of the farmer. More specifically, early adopters were the youngest to adopt organic farming and their decisions were found to be less profit related compared to other groups. Late adoption is constrained by risk considerations, while environmental attitudes and social learning were identified to be important determinants for all adopter groups. Overall, the findings strongly suggest, that for policy measures to be effective, the current state of diffusion has to be taken into account.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

    Volume (Year): 70 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 7 (May)
    Pages: 1406-1414

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:70:y:2011:i:7:p:1406-1414

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

    Related research

    Keywords: Organic farming Early and late adoption Multinomial logit analysis Farmer attitudes;

    References

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    Cited by:
    1. repec:mab:wpaper:18 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Adong, Annet & Mwaura, Francis & Okoboi, Geofrey, 2012. "What determines membership to farmer groups in Uganda? Evidence from the Uganda Census of Agriculture 2008/09," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil, International Association of Agricultural Economists 126774, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Mercedes Beltrán-Esteve & Andrés J. Picazo-Tadeo & Ernest Reig-Martínez, 2012. "What makes a citrus farmer go organic? Empirical evidence from Spanish citrus farming," Working Papers, Department of Applied Economics II, Universidad de Valencia 1205, Department of Applied Economics II, Universidad de Valencia.
    4. Kleemann, Linda & Abdulai, Awudu, 2013. "Organic certification, agro-ecological practices and return on investment: Evidence from pineapple producers in Ghana," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 330-341.
    5. Wollni, Meike & Andersson, Camilla, 2013. "Spatial effects in organic agriculture adoption in Honduras: the role of social conformity, positive externalities, and information," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C., Agricultural and Applied Economics Association 149911, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Wollni, Meike & Andersson, Camilla I.M., 2013. "Spatial patterns of organic agriculture adoption: evidence from Honduras," Discussion Papers 146715, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    7. Läpple, Doris & Kelley, Hugh, 2013. "Understanding the uptake of organic farming: Accounting for heterogeneities among Irish farmers," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 11-19.
    8. Waters, James, 2013. "The influence of information sources on inter- and intra-firm diffusion: evidence from UK farming," MPRA Paper 50955, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Noltze, Martin & Schwarze, Stefan & Qaim, Matin, 2012. "Farm Diversity and Heterogeneous Impacts of System Technologies on Yield, Income and Poverty: The System of Rice Intensification in Timor Leste," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil, International Association of Agricultural Economists 125595, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Wollni, Meike & Andersson, Camilla, 2014. "Spatial patterns of organic agriculture adoption: Evidence from Honduras," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 120-128.

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