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Modelling the adoption of organic horticultural technology in the UK using Duration Analysis

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Author Info

  • Burton, Michael P.
  • Rigby, Dan
  • Young, Trevor

Abstract

Duration Analysis, which allows the timing of an event to be explored in a dynamic framework, is used to model the adoption of organic horticultural technology in the UK. The influence of a range of economic and non-economic determinants is explored using discrete time models. The empirical results highlight the importance of gender, attitudes to the environment and information networks, as well as systematic effects that influence the adoption decision over the lifetime of the producer and over the survey period.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/116172
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society in its journal Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 47 (2003)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:aareaj:116172

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Keywords: Crop Production/Industries;

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References

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  1. Davies, Stephen W., 1979. "Inter-firm diffusion of process innovations," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 299-317, October.
  2. A.J. Fischer & A.J. Arnold & M. Gibbs, 1996. "Information and the Speed of Innovation Adoption," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(4), pages 1073-1081.
  3. Michael Burton & Dan Rigby & Trevor Young, 1999. "Analysis of the Determinants of Adoption of Organic Horticultural Techniques in the UK," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 47-63.
  4. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-98, January.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Läpple, Doris & Kelley, Hugh, 2013. "Understanding the uptake of organic farming: Accounting for heterogeneities among Irish farmers," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 11-19.
  2. Hernandez, Ricardo & Reardon, Thomas, 2012. "Tomato Farmers and Modern Markets in Nicaragua: a Duration Analysis," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124587, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  3. Beyene, Abebe D. & Koch, Steven F., 2013. "Clean fuel-saving technology adoption in urban Ethiopia," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 605-613.
  4. Odendo, Martins & Obare, Gideon A. & Salasya, Beatrice, 2010. "Determinants of the Speed of Adoption of Soil Fertility-Enhancing Technologies in Western Kenya," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 96192, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE);Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
  5. Carletto, Calogero & Kirk, Angeli & Winters, Paul & Davis, Benjamin, 2008. "Globalization and Smallholders: The Adoption, Diffusion, and Welfare Impact of Non-traditional Export Crops in Guatemala," Working Paper Series RP2008/18, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  6. Läpple, Doris & Rensburg, Tom Van, 2011. "Adoption of organic farming: Are there differences between early and late adoption?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(7), pages 1406-1414, May.
  7. Ferto, Imre & Forgacs, Csaba, 2009. "Is organic farming a chance for family farms to survive?," 111th Seminar, June 26-27, 2009, Canterbury, UK 52862, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  8. Magali Aubert & Jean Marie Codron & Sylvain Rousset & Murat Yercan, 2013. "The adoption of IPM practices by small scale producers: the case of greenhouse tomato growers in Turkey," Working Papers 226138, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, France.
  9. Wheeler, Sarah Ann, 2008. "What influences agricultural professionals' views towards organic agriculture?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 145-154, March.
  10. Wheeler, Sarah Ann, 2006. "The Influence of Market and Agricultural Policy Signals on the Level of Organic Farming," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25333, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  11. Hattam, Caroline & Holloway, Garth J., 2007. "Bayes Estimates of Time to Organic Certification," 81st Annual Conference, April 2-4, 2007, Reading University 7979, Agricultural Economics Society.
  12. Lapple, Doris & Donnellan, Trevor, 2009. "Adoption and Abandonment of Organic Farming: An Empirical Investigation of the Irish Drystock Sector," 83rd Annual Conference, March 30-April 1, 2009, Dublin, Ireland 51062, Agricultural Economics Society.
  13. Teresa Serra & Barry Goodwin, 2009. "The efficiency of Spanish arable crop organic farms, a local maximum likelihood approach," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 113-124, April.
  14. Schipmann, Christin & Qaim, Matin, 2009. "Modern Supply Chains and Product Innovation: How Can Smallholder Farmers Benefit?," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51046, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  15. Francksen, Tammo & Hagemann, Martin & Latacz-Lohmann, Uwe, 2011. "Eine empirische Untersuchung zum Wachstum von Milchviehbetrieben mittels der Ereignisanalyse," 51st Annual Conference, Halle, Germany, September 28-30, 2011 114494, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
  16. Radwan, Amr & Gil, Jose Maria & Diab, Yaser A.A. & Abo-Nahoul, Mohamed A., 2011. "Determinants of the Adaption of Organic Agriculture in Egypt Using a Duration Analysis Technique," 85th Annual Conference, April 18-20, 2011, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 108961, Agricultural Economics Society.
  17. Alcon, Francisco & De Miguel, María Dolores & Burton, Michael P., 2008. "Adopción de tecnología de distribución y control del agua en las Comunidades de Regantes de la Región de Murcia," Economia Agraria y Recursos Naturales, Spanish Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(1).
  18. Oostendorp, Remco H. & Zaal, Fred, 2012. "Land Acquisition and the Adoption of Soil and Water Conservation Techniques: A Duration Analysis for Kenya and The Philippines," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1240-1254.
  19. D'Emden, Francis H. & Llewellyn, Rick S. & Burton, Michael P., 2008. "Factors influencing adoption of conservation tillage in Australian cropping regions," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 52(2), June.

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