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Information and the Speed of Innovation Adoption

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  • A.J. Fischer
  • A.J. Arnold
  • M. Gibbs
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    Abstract

    Within a Bayesian framework, a random-effects model is developed and applied to adoption of new wheat varieties in South Australia. In this model, not all pieces of information add equally to knowledge about the innovation. The model shows the acquisition of information to be much slower than has been suggested by previous Bayesian models and can also explain laggards and partial adoption. The results have important practical implications for farmers and support agencies. The paper's theoretical contributions are to highlight the structure of information, and to demonstrate how qualitative results can be obtained where the posterior Bayesian distribution is intractable. Copyright 1996, Oxford University Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its journal American Journal of Agricultural Economics.

    Volume (Year): 78 (1996)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages: 1073-1081

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:78:y:1996:i:4:p:1073-1081

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    Cited by:
    1. Alexander, Corinne E., 2002. "The Role Of Seed Company Supplied Information In Farmers' Decisions," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19617, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Michael Burton & Dan Rigby & Trevor Young, 2003. "Modelling the adoption of organic horticultural technology in the UK using Duration Analysis," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 47(1), pages 29-54, 03.
    3. Place, Frank & Swallow, Brent M., 2000. "Assessing the relationships between property rights and technology adoption in smallholder agriculture: a review of issues and empirical methods," CAPRi working papers 2, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Llewellyn, Rick S. & Lindner, Robert K. & Pannell, David J. & Powles, Stephen B., 2003. "Effective information and the influence of an extension event on perceptions and adoption," 2003 Conference (47th), February 12-14, 2003, Fremantle, Australia 57911, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    5. Nadolnyak, Denis A. & Sheldon, Ian M., 2003. "Valuation Of International Patent Rights For Agricultural Biotechnology: A Real Options Approach," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 21982, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Marra, Michele & Pannell, David J. & Abadi Ghadim, Amir, 2003. "The economics of risk, uncertainty and learning in the adoption of new agricultural technologies: where are we on the learning curve?," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 75(2-3), pages 215-234.
    7. repec:fth:calaec:10-99 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Marra, Michele C. & Hubbell, Bryan J. & Carlson, Gerald A., 2001. "Information Quality, Technology Depreciation, And Bt Cotton Adoption In The Southeast," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(01), July.
    9. Nadolnyak, Denis A. & Sheldon, Ian M., 2002. "A Model of Diffusion of Genetically Modified Crop Technology in Concentrated Agricultural Processing Markets - The Case of Soybeans," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24872, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Nguyen, V.H. & Llewellyn, Rick S. & Miyan, M.S., 2007. "Explaining adoption of durum wheat in Western Australia," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 15.
    11. Kolstad, Charles D. & Kelly, David L. & Mitchell, Glenn, 1999. "Adjustment Costs from Environmental Change Induced by Incomplete Information and Learning," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt9mx119gc, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.
    12. Wheeler, Sarah Ann, 2008. "What influences agricultural professionals' views towards organic agriculture?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 145-154, March.

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