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Examining the evidence of purchasing power parity by recursive mean adjustment

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  • Kim, Hyeongwoo
  • Moh, Young-Kyu

Abstract

This paper revisits the empirical evidence of purchasing power parity under the current float by recursive mean adjustment (RMA) proposed by So and Shin (1999). We first report superior power of the RMA-based unit root test in finite samples relative to the conventional augmented Dickey–Fuller (ADF) test via Monte Carlo experiments for 16 linear and nonlinear autoregressive data generating processes. We find that the more powerful RMA-based unit root test rejects the null hypothesis of a unit root for 16 out of 20 current float real exchange rates relative to the US dollar, while the ADF test rejects only 5 at the 10% significance level. We also find that the computationally simple RMA-based asymptotic confidence interval can provide useful information regarding the half-life of the real exchange rate.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economic Modelling.

Volume (Year): 29 (2012)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 1850-1857

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:29:y:2012:i:5:p:1850-1857

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30411

Related research

Keywords: Recursive mean adjustment; Finite sample performance; Purchasing power parity; Half-life;

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References

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  1. Serena Ng & Pierre Perron, 1997. "Lag Length Selection and the Construction of Unit Root Tests with Good Size and Power," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 369, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 01 Sep 2000.
  2. Cook, Steven, 2002. "Correcting size distortion of the Dickey-Fuller test via recursive mean adjustment," Statistics & Probability Letters, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 75-79, November.
  3. Andrews, Donald W K & Chen, Hong-Yuan, 1994. "Approximately Median-Unbiased Estimation of Autoregressive Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 12(2), pages 187-204, April.
  4. Lutz Kilian, 1999. "Finite-Sample Properties of Percentile and Percentile-t Bootstrap Confidence Intervals for Impulse Responses," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(4), pages 652-660, November.
  5. Bruce E. Hansen, 1999. "The Grid Bootstrap And The Autoregressive Model," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(4), pages 594-607, November.
  6. Alan M. Taylor, 2002. "A Century Of Purchasing-Power Parity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(1), pages 139-150, February.
  7. Hall, Alastair R, 1994. "Testing for a Unit Root in Time Series with Pretest Data-Based Model Selection," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 12(4), pages 461-70, October.
  8. Peter C. B. Phillips & Donggyu Sul, 2003. "Dynamic panel estimation and homogeneity testing under cross section dependence *," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 6(1), pages 217-259, 06.
  9. So, Beong Soo & Shin, Dong Wan, 1999. "Recursive mean adjustment in time-series inferences," Statistics & Probability Letters, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 65-73, May.
  10. Peter C.B. Phillips & Chi-Young Choi & Donggyu Sul, 2004. "Prewhitening Bias in HAC Estimation," Yale School of Management Working Papers ysm426, Yale School of Management.
  11. Chi-Young Choi & Nelson C. Mark & Donggyu Sul, 2010. "Bias Reduction in Dynamic Panel Data Models by Common Recursive Mean Adjustment," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(5), pages 567-599, October.
  12. Rossi, Barbara, 2005. "Confidence Intervals for Half-Life Deviations From Purchasing Power Parity," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 23, pages 432-442, October.
  13. Christian J. Murray & David H. Papell, 2000. "The Purchasing Power Parity Persistence Paradigm," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0017, Econometric Society.
  14. Andrews, Donald W K, 1993. "Exactly Median-Unbiased Estimation of First Order Autoregressive/Unit Root Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(1), pages 139-65, January.
  15. Lutz Kilian, 1998. "Small-Sample Confidence Intervals For Impulse Response Functions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(2), pages 218-230, May.
  16. Kenneth Rogoff, 1996. "The Purchasing Power Parity Puzzle," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(2), pages 647-668, June.
  17. Kim, Hyeongwoo & Stern, Liliana V. & Stern, Michael L., 2010. "Half-life bias correction and the G7 stock markets," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 109(1), pages 1-3, October.
  18. Chi-Young Choi & Young-Kyu Moh, 2007. "How useful are tests for unit-root in distinguishing unit-root processes from stationary but non-linear processes?," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 10(1), pages 82-112, 03.
  19. Taylor, A M Robert, 2002. "Regression-Based Unit Root Tests with Recursive Mean Adjustment for Seasonal and Nonseasonal Time Series," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(2), pages 269-81, April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Cheng, Ka Ming & Durmaz, Nazif & Kim, Hyeongwoo & Stern, Michael L., 2012. "Hysteresis vs. natural rate of US unemployment," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 428-434.
  2. Hyeongwoo Kim & Nazif Durmaz, 2010. "Bias Correction and Out-of-Sample Forecast Accuracy," Auburn Economics Working Paper Series auwp2010-02, Department of Economics, Auburn University.
  3. Meng, Ming & Lee, Hyejin & Cho, Myeong Hyeon & Lee, Junsoo, 2013. "Impacts of the initial observation on unit root tests using recursive demeaning and detrending procedures," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(2), pages 195-199.

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