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Unemployment and labor force participation in urban China

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  • Liu, Qian
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    Abstract

    This paper serves to document and analyze the employment and the labor market changes in urban China since the late 1980s. High and sustained GDP growth rates in China have paradoxically been accompanied by increasing unemployment rates and decreasing labor force participation rates. Using national representative micro data, estimations from logit models show that age, education, communist-party membership and marital status are significantly associated with participation in the labor force and employment opportunities, and the impacts of education and party membership have increased over time. An extension of the Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition finds little of the observed male–female differentials attributable to differences in characteristics such as age or education but to coefficient effects, a possible reflection of discrimination.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): 23 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 18-33

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:23:y:2012:i:1:p:18-33

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chieco

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    Keywords: Urban labor market; China; Labor force; Employment; Unemployment;

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    Cited by:
    1. Wolf-Heimo Grieben & Fuat Sener, 2012. "North-South Trade, Unemployment and Growth: What’s the Role of Labor Unions?," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2012-06, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    2. He, Xiaobo & Zhu, Rong, 2013. "Fertility and Female Labor Force Participation: Causal Evidence from Urban China," MPRA Paper 44552, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Gustafsson, Björn Anders & Li, Shi & Sato, Hiroshi, 2014. "Data for Studying Earnings, the Distribution of Household Income and Poverty in China," IZA Discussion Papers 8244, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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