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Economic transition, gender bias, and the distribution of earnings in China

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  • John A. Bishop
  • Feijun Luo
  • Fang Wang
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    Abstract

    Market-oriented economic reform, which accelerated after 1992, has brought substantial changes to the Chinese economy. This dramatic economic transition was raised two important questions: 'How are women faring in the transition from a planned economy to a market economy?' and 'Are some women faring relatively better than other women'? We use data from the Chinese Household Income Projects for the years 1988 and 1995, a standard earnings equation, and quantile regressions to estimate and decompose the earnings gap. Our findings suggest that while the earnings gap has increased, the fraction of the gap 'unexplained' by differences in human capital variables such as education and experience has declined over time. This result is particularly pronounced for low earning women. Copyright (c) 2005 The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development in its journal The Economics of Transition.

    Volume (Year): 13 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 2 (04)
    Pages: 239-259

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:13:y:2005:i:2:p:239-259

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    Cited by:
    1. Chen, Zhihong & Ge, Ying & Lai, Huiwen & Wan, Chi, 2013. "Globalization and Gender Wage Inequality in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 256-266.
    2. Yi Chen & Sylvie Démurger & Martin Fournier, 2007. "Différentiels salariaux, segmentation et discrimination à l'égard des femmes sur le marché du travail chinois," Post-Print halshs-00144896, HAL.
    3. Gustafsson, Björn & Sai, Ding, 2009. "Rank, income and income inequality in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 497-507, September.
    4. Sylvie Démurger & Martin Fournier & Yi Chen, 2007. "The Evolution of Gender Earnings Gaps and Discrimination in Urban China, 1988-95," Post-Print hal-00138124, HAL.
    5. Magnani, Elisabetta & Zhu, Rong, 2012. "Gender wage differentials among rural–urban migrants in China," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 779-793.
    6. Dileni Gunewardena & Darshi Abeyrathna & Amalie Ellagala & Kamani Rajakaruna & Shobana Rajendran, 2008. "Glass Ceilings, Sticky Floors or Sticky Doors? A Quantile Regression Approach to Exploring Gender Wage Gaps in Sri Lanka," Working Papers PMMA 2008-04, PEP-PMMA.
    7. Liu, Qian, 2012. "Unemployment and labor force participation in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 18-33.
    8. Stefan Gravemeyer & Thomas Gries & Jinjun Xue, 2008. "Discrimination, Income Determination and Inequality – The case of Shenzhen," Working Papers CIE 16, University of Paderborn, CIE Center for International Economics.
    9. Appleton, Simon & Song, Lina & Xia, Qingjie, 2014. "Understanding Urban Wage Inequality in China 1988–2008: Evidence from Quantile Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 1-13.
    10. repec:pdn:wpaper:16 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Dong, Xiao-yuan & Zhang, Liqin, 2009. "Economic transition and gender differentials in wages and productivity: Evidence from Chinese manufacturing enterprises," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 144-156, January.
    12. Dammert, Ana & Ural Marchand, Beyza & Wan, Chi, 2013. "Gender Wage-Productivity Differentials and Global Integration in China," Working Papers 2013-1, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
    13. Sanglestsawai, Santi & Rejesus, Roderick M. & Yorobe, Jose M., 2014. "Do lower yielding farmers benefit from Bt corn? Evidence from instrumental variable quantile regressions," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 285-296.
    14. Gustafsson, Björn Anders & Sai, Ding, 2008. "Rank, Income and Income Inequality in Urban China," IZA Discussion Papers 3843, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Lam, Kevin C.K. & McGuinness, Paul B. & Vieito, João Paulo, 2013. "CEO gender, executive compensation and firm performance in Chinese‐listed enterprises," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 1136-1159.
    16. Sylvie DEMURGER & Martin FOURNIER & CHEN Yi, 2006. "The Evolution of Gender Earnings Gaps and Discrimination in Urban China: 1988-1995," Working Papers 23, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

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