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Citations for "A Market-Based Environmental Policy Experiment in Chile"

by Montero, Juan-Pablo & Sanchez, Jose Miguel & Katz, Ricardo

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  1. Coria, Jessica & Löfgren, Åsa & Sterner, Thomas, 2009. "To Trade or Not to Trade: Firm-Level Analysis of Emissions Trading in Santiago, Chile," Discussion Papers dp-09-25-efd, Resources For the Future.
  2. Jessica Coria, . "Environmental policy, fuel prices and the switching to natural gas in Santiago, Chile," Working Papers 200701, Latin American and Caribbean Environmental Economics Program.
  3. Raúl O'Ryan & José Miguel Sánchez, 2002. "Comparing the Net Benefits of Incentice Based and Command and Control Regulations in a Developing Context: the Case of Santiago, Chile," Documentos de Trabajo 148, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
  4. Cara Inés Villegas & Carlos Chávez, 2004. "Costos de Cumplimiento y Poder de Mercado: Aplicación al Programa de Compensación de Emisiones de Santiago," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 41(122), pages 91-123.
  5. Stavins, Robert, 2001. "Experience with Market-Based Environmental Policy Instruments," Discussion Papers dp-01-58, Resources For the Future.
  6. Stavins, Robert, 2003. "Market-Based Environmental Policies: What Can We Learn from U.S. Experience and Related Research?," Working Paper Series rwp03-031, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  7. Coria, Jessica & Sterner, Thomas, 2008. "Tradable Permits in Developing Countries: Evidence from Air Pollution in Santiago, Chile," Discussion Papers dp-08-34-efd, Resources For the Future.
  8. Brandt, Sylvia, 2007. "Evaluating tradable property rights for natural resources: The role of strategic entry and exit," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 158-176, May.
  9. Meredith Fowlie & Jeffrey M. Perloff, 2013. "Distributing Pollution Rights in Cap-and-Trade Programs: Are Outcomes Independent of Allocation?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(5), pages 1640-1652, December.
  10. Evans, David A. & Kruger, Joseph A., 2006. "Taking up the Slack: Lessons from a Cap-and-Trade Program in Chicago," Discussion Papers dp-06-36, Resources For the Future.
  11. Montero, J-P., 2004. "Pollution Markets with Imperfectly Observed Emissions," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0456, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  12. John K. Stranlund, 2006. "The Regulatory Choice of Noncompliance in Emissions Trading Programs," Working Papers 2006-7, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Resource Economics.
  13. Christian Salas, 2010. "Evaluating Public Policies with High Frequency Data: Evidence for Driving Restrictions in Mexico City Revisited," Documentos de Trabajo 374, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
  14. Montero, J-P., 2004. "Tradable Permits with Incomplete Monitoring: Evidence from Santiago’s Particulate Permits Program," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0457, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  15. Carmen Arguedas & Eva Camacho & José Zofío, 2010. "Environmental Policy Instruments: Technology Adoption Incentives with Imperfect Compliance," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 47(2), pages 261-274, October.
  16. Lynham, John, 2014. "How have catch shares been allocated?," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 42-48.
  17. Enrique Calfucura & Jessica Coria & José Miguel Sánchez, 2008. "Permisos Transables de Emisión en Chile: Lecciones, Desafíos y Oportunidades para Países en Desarrollo," Documentos de Trabajo 347, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
  18. Martin, Rodrigo San, 2003. "Marketable emission permits with imperfect monitoring," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(13), pages 1369-1378, October.
  19. Murphy, James J. & Stranlund, John K., 2007. "A laboratory investigation of compliance behavior under tradable emissions rights: Implications for targeted enforcement," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 196-212, March.
  20. Restiani, Phillia & Betz, Regina, 2010. "A Theoretical Model of Optimal Compliance Decisions under Different Penalty Designs in Emissions Trading Markets," Research Reports 107585, Australian National University, Environmental Economics Research Hub.
  21. Caffera, Marcelo, 2011. "The use of economic instruments for pollution control in Latin America: lessons for future policy design," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(03), pages 247-273, June.
  22. Juan-Pablo Montero, 2004. "Markets for environmental protection: design and performance incomplete enforcement," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 31(1 Year 20), pages 79-99, June.
  23. Juan Pablo Montero & Luis Cifuentes & Felipe Soto, 2000. "Participación voluntaria en políticas internacionales de cambio climático: implicancias para Chile," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 27(1 Year 20), pages 69-93, June.
  24. Kim, Hwa Nyeon & Woodward, Richard T. & Griffin, Wade L., 2005. "Transferable Rights of Recreational Fishery: An Application to Red Snapper Fishery in the Gulf of Mexico," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19261, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  25. Gautier Kohler & Benoit Lefèvre;, 2011. "A comparative analysis of city-based emission trading schemes: key design and management factors for environmental cost effectiveness," International Journal of Global Energy Issues, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 35(2/3/4), pages 215-241.
This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.