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Citations for "Cyclical fluctuations and sectoral reallocation : Evidence from the PSID"

by Loungani, Prakash & Rogerson, Richard

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  1. repec:rim:rimwps:27-08 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Lucia Alessi & Matteo Barigozzi & Marco Capasso, 2006. "A Dynamic Factor Analysis of Business Cycle on Firm-Level Data," LEM Papers Series 2006/27, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  3. Andrew Figura, 2006. "Why Are Plant Deaths Countercyclical: Reallocation Timing or Fragility?," Working Papers 06-24, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  4. Robert F. Engle & Joao Victor Issler, 1993. "Estimating Sectoral Cycles Using Cointegration and Common Features," NBER Working Papers 4529, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Andrew Figura, 2003. "The effect of restructuring on unemployment," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2003-56, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  6. Michael P. Keane, 1990. "Sectoral shift theories of unemployment: evidence from panel data," Discussion Paper / Institute for Empirical Macroeconomics 28, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  7. Jeremy Greenwood & Glenn M. MacDonald & Guang-Jia Zhang, 1995. "The cyclical behavior of job creation and job destruction: A sectoral model," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 7(1), pages 95-112.
  8. Gerald A. Carlino & Keith Sill, 1996. "Common trends and common cycles in regional per capita incomes," Working Papers 96-13, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  9. S. Lael Brainard & David M. Cutler, 1990. "Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Unemployment Reconsidered," NBER Working Papers 3491, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Andrew Figura, 2006. "Why are plant deaths countercyclical: reallocation timing or fragility?," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2006-31, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  11. G. Gallipoli & G. Pelloni, 2013. "Macroeconomic Effects of Job Reallocations: A Survey," Working Papers wp897, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  12. Shin, Kwanho, 1997. "Sectoral shocks and movement costs: Effects on employment and welfare," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 21(2-3), pages 449-471.
  13. Kambourov, Gueorgui & Manovskii, Iourii, 2004. "Rising Occupational and Industry Mobility in the United States: 1968-1993," IZA Discussion Papers 1110, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Gregory W. Huffman & Mark A. Wynne, 1995. "The role of intratemporal adjustment costs in a multi-sector economy," Working Papers 9508, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  15. Wheeler, Christopher H., 2007. "Job Flows And Productivity Dynamics: Evidence From U.S. Manufacturing," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(02), pages 175-201, April.
  16. Engle, Robert F. & Issler, Joao Victor, 1995. "Estimating common sectoral cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 83-113, February.
  17. Yongsung Chang & Noh-Sun Kwark, 2000. "Decomposition of Hours Based on Extensive and Intensive Margins of Labor," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1416, Econometric Society.
  18. Lucca, David & Seru, Amit & Trebbi, Francesco, 2014. "The revolving door and worker flows in banking regulation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 17-32.
  19. Donghoon Lee & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2004. "Intersectoral Labor Mobility and the Growth of the Service Sector," PIER Working Paper Archive 04-036, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  20. Fernando Alvarez & Robert Shimer, 2011. "Search and Rest Unemployment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(1), pages 75-122, 01.
  21. Lee, Kiseok & Ni, Shawn, 2002. "On the dynamic effects of oil price shocks: a study using industry level data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 823-852, May.
  22. Dave Reifschneider & William Wascher & David Wilcox, 2015. "Aggregate Supply in the United States: Recent Developments and Implications for the Conduct of Monetary Policy," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 63(1), pages 71-109, May.
  23. Gianluigi Pelloni & Wolfgang Polasek, . "Intersectoral Labour Reallocation and Employment Volatility: A Bayesian Analysis using a VAR-GARCH-M model," Discussion Papers 99/4, Department of Economics, University of York.
  24. Steven J. Davis & John Haltiwanger, 1998. "Measuring Gross Worker and Job Flows," NBER Chapters, in: Labor Statistics Measurement Issues, pages 77-122 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  25. Thomas, Jonathan M., 1996. "Sectoral shifts and the mobility of displaced workers: When are microdata useful?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 337-343, September.
  26. Charles T. Carlstrom & Edward N. Gamber, 1991. "Magnification effects and acyclical real wages," Working Paper 9105, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  27. Andrew Figura, 2002. "The cyclical behavior of short-term and long-term job flows," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2002-12, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  28. Andrew Figura, 2002. "Is reallocation related to the cycle? A look at permanent and temporary job flows," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2002-16, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  29. Storer, Paul, 1996. "Separating the effects of aggregate and sectoral shocks with estimates from a Markov-switching search model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 20(1-3), pages 93-121.
  30. Phelan, Christopher & Trejos, Alberto, 2000. "The aggregate effects of sectoral reallocations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 249-268, April.
  31. Bauer, Anja, 2015. "Reallocation patterns across occupations," IAB Discussion Paper 201526, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
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