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Citations for "The Neolithic Revolution and Contemporary Variations in Life Expectancy"

by Oded Galor & Omer Moav

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  1. Peter Lorentzen & John McMillan & Romain Wacziarg, 2006. "Death and Development," 2006 Meeting Papers 61, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  2. Raouf Boucekkine & Giorgio Fabbri & Fausto Gozzi, 2012. "Egalitarism under Population Change. The Role of Growth and Lifetime Span," AMSE Working Papers 1211, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France.
  3. Galor, Oded & Michalopoulos, Stelios, 2012. "Evolution and the growth process: Natural selection of entrepreneurial traits," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 147(2), pages 759-780.
  4. Gregory Dow & Clyde Reed & Nancy Olewiler, 2009. "Climate reversals and the transition to agriculture," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 27-53, March.
  5. Jacob Weisdorf, 2008. "Why did the First Farmers Toil? Human Metabolism and the Origins of Agriculture," Discussion Papers 08-15, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  6. Oded Galor & Marc Klemp, 2014. "The Biocultural Origins of Human Capital Formation," NBER Working Papers 20474, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Quamrul Ashraf & Stelios Michalopoulos, 2014. "Climatic Fluctuations and the Diffusion of Agriculture," Department of Economics Working Papers 2015-07, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  8. Carl-Johan Dalgaard & Holger Strulik, 2012. "The Genesis of the Golden Age - Accounting for the Rise in Health and Leisure," Discussion Papers 12-10, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  9. Hansen, Casper Worm, 2013. "The diffusion of health technologies: Cultural and biological divergence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 21-34.
  10. Galor, Oded & Klemp, Marc, 2013. "Be Fruitful and Multiply? Moderate Fecundity and Long-Run Reproductive Success," MPRA Paper 52049, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Louis Putterman & David N. Weil, 2010. "Post-1500 Population Flows and the Long-Run Determinants of Economic Growth and Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 125(4), pages 1627-1682, November.
  12. Arthur J. Robson, 2010. "A bioeconomic view of the Neolithic transition to agriculture," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 43(1), pages 280-300, February.
  13. Borcan, Oana & Olsson, Ola & Putterman, Louis, 2014. "State History and Economic Development: Evidence from Six Millennia," Working Papers in Economics 602, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  14. Jacob L. Weisdorf, 2007. "Made for Toil: Natural selection at the dawn of agriculture," PSE Working Papers halshs-00587788, HAL.
  15. C. Cook, 2014. "The role of lactase persistence in precolonial development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 19(4), pages 369-406, December.
  16. Stephen Knowles & P. Dorian Owen, 2010. "Which Institutions are Good for Your Health? The Deep Determinants of Comparative Cross-country Health Status," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(4), pages 701-723.
  17. Brian Snowdon, 2008. "Towards a Unified Theory of Economic Growth," World Economics, World Economics, Economic & Financial Publishing, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 9(2), pages 97-151, April.
  18. RICCI Francesco & ZACHARIADIS Marios, 2009. "Longevity and Education Externalities: A Macroeconomic Perspective," LERNA Working Papers 09.02.278, LERNA, University of Toulouse.
  19. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00587788 is not listed on IDEAS
  20. Brian Snowdon, 2008. "Towards a Unified Theory of Economic Growth: Oded Galor on the Transition from Malthusian Stagnation to Modern Economic Growth," Working Papers 2008-4, Brown University, Department of Economics.
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