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Marginal employment and health in Germany and the United Kingdom: Does unstable employment predict health?

  • Rodriguez, Eunice
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    This study examines the possible health impact of marginal employment, including both temporary and part-time employment schemes. It addresses a growing concern in Europe that fixed-term employment and other forms of marginal employment may generate social inequality. Logistic regression models were used to analyze panel data from Germany and the U.K. (1991-93), available in the Household Panel Comparability Project data base. We included 11,980 respondents from Germany and 8,729 from the United Kingdom. The health dependent variable used was a single measure of perceived health status.

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    File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/43941/1/306690098.pdf
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    Paper provided by Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB) in its series Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Labor Market Policy and Employment with number FS I 99-203.

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    Date of creation: 1999
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    Handle: RePEc:zbw:wzblpe:fsi99203
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Reichpietschufer 50, 10785 Berlin, Germany
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    Web page: http://www.wzb.eu/
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    1. Janet Currie & Brigitte C. Madrian, 1998. "Health, Health Insurance and the Labor Market," JCPR Working Papers 27, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    2. Richard V. Burkhauser & John G. Poupore, 1997. "A Cross-National Comparison Of Permanent Inequality In The United States And Germany," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(1), pages 10-17, February.
    3. Schmid, G√ľnther, 1998. "Transitional labour markets: A new European employment strategy," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Labor Market Policy and Employment FS I 98-206, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    4. Rebecca M. Blank, 1994. "The Dynamics of Part-Time Work," NBER Working Papers 4911, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Brenner, M. Harvey & Mooney, Anne, 1983. "Unemployment and health in the context of economic change," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 17(16), pages 1125-1138, January.
    6. Messing, Karen & Dumais, Lucie & Romito, Patrizia, 1993. "Prostitutes and chimney sweeps both have problems: Towards full integration of both sexes in the study of occupational health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 47-55, January.
    7. Karoly, L.A., 1996. "Anatomy of the US Income Distribution: Two Decades of Change," Papers 96-07, RAND - Reprint Series.
    8. Jacqueline Laufer, 1998. "Equal Opportunity between Men and Women: The Case of France," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(1), pages 53-69.
    9. Karoly, Lynn A, 1996. "Anatomy of the US Income Distribution: Two Decades of Change," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 76-95, Spring.
    10. Platt, Stephen & Micciolo, Rocco & Tansella, Michele, 1992. "Suicide and unemployment in Italy: Description, analysis and interpretation of recent trends," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 34(11), pages 1191-1201, June.
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