IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/vfsc16/145584.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

International Capital Flows and the Allocation of Credit Across Firms

Author

Listed:
  • te Kaat, Daniel Marcel

Abstract

Substantial research yields opposing conclusions regarding the effects of international capital flows on economic growth. However, microeconomic channels that help to explain these inconsistencies are to date underexplored. This paper overcomes intricate identification issues by using a comprehensive dataset that covers about 20,000 firm-year observations to study the effects of the exogenous fluctuations in European capital flows on bank lending and the real behavior of firms from 1995-2014. We find that higher capital inflows are associated with more loans to less profitable firms, thereby, impeding the creative economic destruction. Consequently, there is evidence for time-varying implications of foreign capital for economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • te Kaat, Daniel Marcel, 2016. "International Capital Flows and the Allocation of Credit Across Firms," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145584, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc16:145584
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/145584/1/VfS_2016_pid_6447.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Allen, Franklin & Gale, Douglas, 1999. "Diversity of Opinion and Financing of New Technologies," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 8(1-2), pages 68-89, January.
    2. Samuel Bentolila & Marcel Jansen & Gabriel Jiménez, 2018. "When Credit Dries Up: Job Losses in the Great Recession," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 650-695.
    3. Viral V Acharya & Tim Eisert & Christian Eufinger & Christian Hirsch, 2018. "Real Effects of the Sovereign Debt Crisis in Europe: Evidence from Syndicated Loans," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 31(8), pages 2855-2896.
    4. Jean Arcand & Enrico Berkes & Ugo Panizza, 2015. "Too much finance?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 105-148, June.
    5. Joshua Aizenman & Yothin Jinjarak & Donghyun Park, 2013. "Capital Flows and Economic Growth in the Era of Financial Integration and Crisis, 1990–2010," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 371-396, July.
    6. Laura Alfaro & Andrew Charlton, 2007. "International Financial Integration and Entrepreneurial Firm Activity," NBER Working Papers 13118, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bednarek, Peter & Dinger, Valeriya & te Kaat, Daniel Marcel & von Westernhagen, Natalja, 2020. "Central bank funding and credit risk-taking," Discussion Papers 36/2020, Deutsche Bundesbank.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc16:145584. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfsocea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.