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What Are The Returns To Regional Mobility? Evidence From Mass Layoffs

Author

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  • Findeisen, Sebastian
  • Dauth, Wolfgang
  • Lindner, Attila

Abstract

This paper estimates the effects of regional mobility on individual employment prospects and wages, exploiting rich German social security data spanning over 30 years. Our focus is on unemployed workers with strong labor force attachment who search for employment after being exposed to a mass layoff. By that we concentrate on a group of individuals who are plausibly searching for employment for exogenous reasons. Comparing individuals who stay in the local labor market to movers, we find that employment rates are around 15 percentage points higher for movers three years after the layoff. Large differences in employment rates persist even 10 years after the layoff. In contrast, there are no effects of regional mobility on wages conditional on finding employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Findeisen, Sebastian & Dauth, Wolfgang & Lindner, Attila, 2015. "What Are The Returns To Regional Mobility? Evidence From Mass Layoffs," VfS Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112908, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc15:112908
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Card & Jörg Heining & Patrick Kline, 2013. "Workplace Heterogeneity and the Rise of West German Wage Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(3), pages 967-1015.
    2. Ashenfelter, Orley C, 1978. "Estimating the Effect of Training Programs on Earnings," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(1), pages 47-57, February.
    3. Schmieder, Johannes F. & Wachter, Till von & Bender, Stefan, 2010. "The effects of unemployment insurance on labor supply and search outcomes : regression discontinuity estimates from Germany," IAB Discussion Paper 201004, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    4. Justin McCrary, 2007. "The Effect of Court-Ordered Hiring Quotas on the Composition and Quality of Police," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 318-353, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fehn, Rebecca & Frings, Hanna, 2018. "Decomposing the Returns to Regional Mobility," VfS Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181609, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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