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The Impact of Access to Piped Drinking Water on Human Capital Formation - Evidence from Brasilian Primary Schools


  • Barde, Julia Alexa
  • Walkiewicz, Juliana


We analyze the impact of access to piped water on human capital formation as measured by test scores from standardized school exams at Brasilian primary schools. We fi nd a positive and signi ficant eff ect of around 11 percent of the standard deviation of mean test scores. The eff ect of piped water on test scores increases with the level of education of the mother. This complementarity is more pronounced for families with income below average income and vanishes for families with income above mean. This allows important policy recommendations. Developing countries should focus infrastructure expansion on low income areas and complement them with educational interventions for families with low educational background to increase returns on investment.

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  • Barde, Julia Alexa & Walkiewicz, Juliana, 2013. "The Impact of Access to Piped Drinking Water on Human Capital Formation - Evidence from Brasilian Primary Schools," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79808, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc13:79808

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    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods

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