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Big data comes to Hollywood: Audiovisuelle Medienmärkte im digitalen Zeitalter

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  • Gänßle, Sophia

Abstract

Die Traumfabrik Hollywood dominiert seit Dekaden die internationale Filmindustrie. Die gro-ßen amerikanischen Studios produzieren und vertreiben Filme, wobei sie alle Innovationen des 20ten Jahrhundert, von Fernsehen über VHS bis Blu-ray, überstanden haben. Die Digitalisie-rung bringt tiefgreifende technische Innovationen und damit auch neuen Wettbewerb in den Markt. Die großen Hollywood Studios stehen nun der Konkurrenz von Streamingdiensten wie Netflix und Amazon Prime Video gegenüber. Die digitale Überlegenheit dieser neuen Giganten und deren Umgang mit Daten stellen einen elementaren Unterschied zu den bisherigen Strate-gien der Studios dar. Dieser Beitrag zeigt die Änderungen auf und analysiert die neue Wettbe-werbssituation in der Filmindustrie.

Suggested Citation

  • Gänßle, Sophia, 2020. "Big data comes to Hollywood: Audiovisuelle Medienmärkte im digitalen Zeitalter," Ilmenau Economics Discussion Papers 144, Ilmenau University of Technology, Institute of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:tuiedp:144
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