IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/tuiedp/101.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Do preferences for pop music converge across countries? Empirical evidence from the Eurovision Song Contest

Author

Listed:
  • Budzinski, Oliver
  • Pannicke, Julia

Abstract

The combination of the digitalization of cultural goods and facilitated cross-border availability through the internet fuels a globalization process that is of-ten said to cause a homogenization of demand across countries, in particular, for entertainment goods as music and movies. In the markets for music, this implies that the same hits and the same artists should be popular across countries and cultures. In order to test this hypothesis, we analyze historical voting data of the Eurovision Song Contest, the worldwide biggest live broadcasted international music competi-tion between all countries of the European Broadcasting Union. It covers the period from 1975-2016 where digitalization and internet availability were invented and evolved into mass phenomena. Consequently, according to the outlined theory of homogenization of preferences, voting should have become more concentrated on the leading artists and less focused on regional differences in taste. For the purpose of detecting concentration trends in the points allocation, we employ different indi-cators for measuring concentration. First, we calculate a concentration ratio, repre-senting the accumulated total number of points of the top three, five and ten-placed countries in each year of the contest. Second, we calculate the Herfindahl-Hirschman-Index (HHI) and, third, the Gini-Coefficient for each year. Furthermore, we test trend-lines for statistical significance. The results show, that our analysis cannot support the thesis of preference homogenization. We find no significant trend towards pref-erence convergence. In contrast, some of the employed indicators and methods point towards significant, albeit weak, deconcentration trends in voting behavior for the contest.

Suggested Citation

  • Budzinski, Oliver & Pannicke, Julia, 2016. "Do preferences for pop music converge across countries? Empirical evidence from the Eurovision Song Contest," Ilmenau Economics Discussion Papers 101, Ilmenau University of Technology, Institute of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:tuiedp:101
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/142326/1/862203147.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin B. Schmidt & David J. Berri, 2001. "Competitive Balance and Attendance," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 2(2), pages 145-167, May.
    2. Marco Haan & S. Dijkstra & Peter Dijkstra, 2005. "Expert Judgment Versus Public Opinion – Evidence from the Eurovision Song Contest," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(1), pages 59-78, February.
    3. Ginsburgh, Victor & Noury, Abdul G., 2008. "The Eurovision Song Contest. Is voting political or cultural?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 41-52, March.
    4. Severin Borenstein, 1989. "Hubs and High Fares: Dominance and Market Power in the U.S. Airline Industry," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 20(3), pages 344-365, Autumn.
    5. Fernando Ferreira & Joel Waldfogel, 2013. "Pop Internationalism: Has Half a Century of World Music Trade Displaced Local Culture?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 123, pages 634-664, June.
    6. Sofronis Clerides & Thanasis Stengos, 2006. "Love thy Neighbor, Love thy Kin: Voting Biases in the Eurovision Song Contest," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 1-2006, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    7. Sumner, Daniel A, 1981. "Measurement of Monopoly Behavior: An Application to the Cigarette Industry," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(5), pages 1010-1019, October.
    8. Laura Spierdijk & Michel Vellekoop, 2009. "The structure of bias in peer voting systems: lessons from the Eurovision Song Contest," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 403-425, May.
    9. repec:ehu:cuader:20080802 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Sullivan, Daniel, 1985. "Testing Hypotheses about Firm Behavior in the Cigarette Industry," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(3), pages 586-598, June.
    11. Gilbert, R Alton, 1984. "Bank Market Structure and Competition: A Survey," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 16(4), pages 617-644, November.
    12. Evans, William N & Kessides, Ioannis N, 1993. "Localized Market Power in the U.S. Airline Industry," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 75(1), pages 66-75, February.
    13. Lisa M. George & Christian Peukert, 2014. "YouTube Decade: Cultural Convergence in Recorded Music," Working Papers 14-11, NET Institute.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cultural convergence; Eurovision Song Contest; media economics; cultural economics; empirical economics;

    JEL classification:

    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General
    • L82 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Entertainment; Media
    • F60 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - General
    • C01 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - Econometrics

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:tuiedp:101. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ivtuide.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.