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An experimental test of direct and indirect reciprocity in case of complete and incomplete information

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  • Dufwenberg, Martin
  • Gneezy, Uri
  • Güth, Werner
  • van Damme, Eric E. C.

Abstract

Direct reciprocity means to respond in kind to another person whereas indirect reciprocity is understood here as rewarding someone else. We perform corresponding experiments which use a similar underlying structure as the reciprocity experiment of Berg, Dickhaut, and McCabe (1995). Another variation concerns the information about the multiplier of donations where we compare the benchmark case with a commonly known multiplier to a condition where the multiplier is known for sure only by donators. Questions which we try to answer are: Will indirect reciprocity induce higher or lower donations?, will donators with the high multiplier hide behind the small one?, how do receivers respond to the different situations?

Suggested Citation

  • Dufwenberg, Martin & Gneezy, Uri & Güth, Werner & van Damme, Eric E. C., 2000. "An experimental test of direct and indirect reciprocity in case of complete and incomplete information," SFB 373 Discussion Papers 2000,36, Humboldt University of Berlin, Interdisciplinary Research Project 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:sfb373:200036
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    Cited by:

    1. Blanco Mariana, 2015. "Piqueteros: An Experimental Analysis of Direct vs. Indirect Reciprocity," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 21(1), pages 37-57, January.
    2. Balafoutas, Loukas, 2011. "Public beliefs and corruption in a repeated psychological game," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 78(1-2), pages 51-59, April.
    3. Greiner, Ben & Vittoria Levati, M., 2005. "Indirect reciprocity in cyclical networks: An experimental study," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 711-731, October.
    4. Werner G³th & Manfred K÷nigstein & NadÞge Marchand & Klaus Nehring, 2001. "Trust and Reciprocity in the Investment Game with Indirect Reward," Homo Oeconomicus, Institute of SocioEconomics, vol. 18, pages 241-262.
    5. Seinen, Ingrid & Schram, Arthur, 2006. "Social status and group norms: Indirect reciprocity in a repeated helping experiment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 581-602, April.
    6. Nikolaos Georgantzís & Constantine Manasakis & Evangelos Mitrokostas & Emmanuel Petrakis, 2008. "Strategic Delegation in Experimental Duopolies with Endogenous Incentive Contracts," Working Papers 0809, University of Crete, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    experiment; reciprocity; Trust; game;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior

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