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Media coverage and stock returns on the London Stock Exchange, 1825-70

Author

Listed:
  • Turner, John D.
  • Ye, Qing
  • Walker, Clive B.

Abstract

News media plays an important role in modern financial markets. In this paper, we analyse the role played by the news media in an historical financial market. Using The Times's coverage of companies listed on the London stock market between 1825 and 1870, we examine the determinants of media coverage in this era and whether there was a media discount. Our main finding is that a media discount only manifests itself after the mid-1840s and that the introduction of arm's-length ownership along with markedly increased market participation was the main reason for the emergence of this discount.

Suggested Citation

  • Turner, John D. & Ye, Qing & Walker, Clive B., 2016. "Media coverage and stock returns on the London Stock Exchange, 1825-70," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2016-02, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:qucehw:201602
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ye, Qing & Turner, John D., 2014. "The cross-section of stock returns in an early stock market," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 114-123.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hanna, Alan J. & Turner, John D. & Walker, Clive B., 2017. "News media and investor sentiment over the long run," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2017-06, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    media; financial press; historical stock markets; advertising;

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • N23 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Europe: Pre-1913

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