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Identity-driven cooperation versus competition

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  • Snower, Dennis J.
  • Bosworth, Steven

Abstract

This paper seeks to extend the domain of identity economics by exploring motivational foundations of in-group cooperation and out-group competition. On this basis, we explore the reflexive interaction between individual economic decisions and social identities in response to technological change in market economies. Our analysis explores how technological change falling on marketable goods and services, rather than non-market caring relationships, leads to a restructuring of identities, which increases the scope of individualism and promotes positional competition at the expense of caring activities. Since positional competition generates negative externalities while caring activities create positive ones, these developments have important welfare implications.

Suggested Citation

  • Snower, Dennis J. & Bosworth, Steven, 2015. "Identity-driven cooperation versus competition," Kiel Working Papers 2017, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkwp:2017
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dennis J. Snower & Steven J. Bosworth, 2016. "Identity-Driven Cooperation versus Competition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 420-424, May.
    2. Bosworth, Steven J. & Singer, Tania & Snower, Dennis J., 2016. "Cooperation, motivation and social balance," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 126(PB), pages 72-94.
    3. Akerlof George A & Kranton Rachel, 2010. "Identity Economics," The Economists' Voice, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-3, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Grosch, Kerstin & Ibañez, Marcela & Viceisza, Angelino, 2022. "Competition and prosociality: A lab-in-the-field experiment in Ghana," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 99(C).
    2. Fleurbaey, Marc & Kanbur, Ravi & Viney, Brody, 2020. "Social Externalities and Economic Analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 15179, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Steven J. Bosworth & Dennis J. Snower, 2019. "The Interplay of Economic, Social and Political Fragmentation," CESifo Working Paper Series 7935, CESifo.
    4. Jiabin Wu, 2021. "Stochastic Value Formation," Dynamic Games and Applications, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 597-611, September.
    5. Dennis J. Snower & Steven J. Bosworth, 2016. "Identity-Driven Cooperation versus Competition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 420-424, May.
    6. Lima de Miranda, Katharina & Snower, Dennis J., 2020. "Recoupling Economic and Social Prosperity," IZA Discussion Papers 12998, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Colin Jennings & Elizabeth Ralph-Morrow, 2020. "Selective tolerance and the radical right," Rationality and Society, , vol. 32(2), pages 144-167, May.
    8. Bosworth, Steven & Snower, Dennis J., 2020. "Technological advance, social fragmentation and welfare," Kiel Working Papers 2177, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
    9. Marc Fleurbaey & Ravi Kanbur & Dennis Snower & Dennis J. Snower, 2021. "Efficiency and Equity in a Society-Economy Integrated Model," CESifo Working Paper Series 9259, CESifo.
    10. Fleurbaey, Marc & Kanbur, Ravi & Viney, Brody, 2020. "Social Externalities and Economic Analysis," Working Papers 309990, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    11. Snower, Dennis J. & Bosworth, Steven J., 2021. "Economic, social and political fragmentation: Linking knowledge-biased growth, identity, populism and protectionism," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C).
    12. Snower, Dennis J., 2019. "The Interplay of Economic, Social and Political Fragmentation," CEPR Discussion Papers 14111, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    motivation; reflexivity; cooperation; identity; technological progress; bowling alone;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A13 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Social Values
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • D71 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Social Choice; Clubs; Committees; Associations
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General

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