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Wages and employment by skill level in Southern and Eastern Europe during the crisis

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  • Croci Angelini, Elisabetta
  • Farina, Francesco
  • Valentini, Enzo

Abstract

Occupations and sectors are the two fundamental dimensions of structural change. From the evolution of the high/low-skill employment levels and wage ratio, we can understand which sectors have been undertaking a process of technical change. By using Eu-Silc database we investigate four “Southern Europe” countries (Italy, Spain, Greece, Portugal), three “Eastern Europe” countries (Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria), UK and Austria. Our analysis shows that the crisis seems to have radically changed the behavior of economies and sectors. It emerges that Poland behaves in a similar way to Austria (with a growing role of technology and Skill Biased Technical Change), while in Hungary the economic system seems to be restructuring as Iberian countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Croci Angelini, Elisabetta & Farina, Francesco & Valentini, Enzo, 2017. "Wages and employment by skill level in Southern and Eastern Europe during the crisis," GLO Discussion Paper Series 153, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:153
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Technical change; Labour; Skill premium; Country studies;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • P51 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Analysis of Economic Systems

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