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Causes of World Trade Growth in Agricultural and Food Products, 1951 - 2000


  • Raúl Serrano

    () (Department of Applied Economics and Economic History, University of Zaragoza)

  • Vicente Pinilla

    (Department of Applied Economics and Economic History, University of Zaragoza)


The objective of the present study is to analyse the causes of the growth of international agricultural and food trade in volume terms from 1951 to 2000. The results suggest that income growth has been the principal reason for this expansion, while exchange rate stability and the real price of agricultural products played only a minor role. Multilateral trade liberalisation and trade costs, given their long-term stability, are not elements which could have stimulated their growth. Finally, the intensive liberalisation of trade which took place in various economic regions, especially in Europe, became a key factor in promoting agricultural trade among the countries participating in regional trade agreements. The study results also indicate that the determinants of trade growth for these goods were different to those for other goods and other periods.

Suggested Citation

  • Raúl Serrano & Vicente Pinilla, 2006. "Causes of World Trade Growth in Agricultural and Food Products, 1951 - 2000," Documentos de Trabajo dt2006-07, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
  • Handle: RePEc:zar:wpaper:dt2006-07

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Nicholas Crafts & Anthony Venables, 2003. "Globalization in History.A Geographical Perspective," NBER Chapters,in: Globalization in Historical Perspective, pages 323-370 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Diaz-Bonilla, Eugenio & Reca, Lucio, 2000. "Trade and agroindustrialization in developing countries: trends and policy impacts," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 23(3), pages 219-229, September.
    3. Kevin H. O'Rourke & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2001. "Globalization and History: The Evolution of a Nineteenth-Century Atlantic Economy," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262650592, January.
    4. Diaz-Bonilla, Eugenio & Tin, Jonathan, 2002. "That was then but this is now," TMD discussion papers 94, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Engle, Robert F. & Yoo, Byung Sam, 1987. "Forecasting and testing in co-integrated systems," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 143-159, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pinilla, Vicente & Serrano, Raúl, 2008. "The Agricultural and Food Trade in the First Globalization: Spanish Table Wine Exports 1871 to 1935 – A Case Study," Journal of Wine Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(02), pages 132-148, December.
    2. R.Serrano & V.Pinilla, 2011. "Agricultural and Food Trade in European Union Countries, 1963-2000: A Gravity Equation Approach," Economies et Sociétés (Serie 'Histoire Economique Quantitative'), Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), issue 43, pages 191-229, January.
    3. Raúl Serranoa & Vicente Pinilla, 2010. "The Evolution and Changing Geographical Structure of World Agri-food Trade, 1950-2000," Working Papers 10-06, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).

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