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The Degree Of Competition In The European Football Leagues: A Statistical Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Ferda HALICIOGLU

    (The University of Greenwich)

Abstract

As a professional sport, professional football teams in a league compete in imperfect market conditions since every team in a professional football league may be known by their differentiated product (i.e. the quality of football they play). If the competition level increases, the quality of football being played may also increase. Thus, consumers`(i.e. football spectators) value of money spent on football should increase too. Thus, this paper tries to implement the above mentioned economic principle through a statistical method on nine European countries football leagues, in an individual and comparative manner. During the estimation period, it is calculated that, on average, the highest level of football competition took place in France, whereas Turkish football came last.

Suggested Citation

  • Ferda HALICIOGLU, 2005. "The Degree Of Competition In The European Football Leagues: A Statistical Approach," Others 0508001, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpot:0508001
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 18
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    File URL: https://econwpa.ub.uni-muenchen.de/econ-wp/othr/papers/0508/0508001.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. J. C. H. Jones, 1969. "The Economics of the National Hockey League," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 2(1), pages 1-20, February.
    2. Baimbridge, Mark & Cameron, Samuel & Dawson, Peter, 1996. "Satellite Television and the Demand for Football: A Whole New Ball Game?," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 43(3), pages 317-333, August.
    3. El-Hodiri, Mohamed & Quirk, James, 1971. "An Economic Model of a Professional Sports League," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 79(6), pages 1302-1319, Nov.-Dec..
    4. Peel, David A & Thomas, Dennis A, 1988. "Outcome Uncertainty and the Demand for Football: An Analysis of Match Attendances in the English Football League," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 35(3), pages 242-249, August.
    5. Peter J. Sloane, 2000. "The Regulation of Professional Team Sports," IASE Conference Papers 0003, International Association of Sports Economists.
    6. Sloane, Peter J, 1971. "The Economics of Professional Football: The Football Club as a Utility Maximiser," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 18(2), pages 121-146, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ferda Halicioglu, 2005. "Do We Need a New Point System in Professional Football Leagues?," Others 0503004, EconWPA.
    2. Ferda HALICIOGLU, 2005. "Forecasting the Professional Team Sporting Events: Evidence from Euro 2000 and 2004 Football Tournaments," Industrial Organization 0508001, EconWPA.
    3. Halicioglu Ferda, 2009. "Research on the Prediction of the likely Winners of the Euro 2008 Football Tournament," Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, De Gruyter, vol. 5(3), pages 1-15, July.
    4. Raul Caruso & Ilaria Verri, 2009. "Competitive Balance dopo la sentenza Bosman: il caso della pallavolo in Italia," Rivista di Diritto ed Economia dello Sport, Centro di diritto e business dello Sport, vol. 5(1), pages 59-79, Maggio.
    5. Ferda Halicioglu, 2005. "Can We Predict The Outcome Of The International Football Tournaments : The Case Of Euro 2000?," Microeconomics 0503008, EconWPA.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    football ranking; European Football; optimal football league;

    JEL classification:

    • L50 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - General
    • H80 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - General

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