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The Value of Information: Disadvantageous Risk-Sharing Markets


  • Eyal Sulganik

    (The Foerder Institute for Economic Research, TAU)

  • Itzhak Zilcha


The narrow applicability of Blackwell's result that "more information" is desirable, lies in the fact in economic models once a signal is observed by all economic agents their opportunity sets may vary. We show that Blackwell's theorem does not hold when the feasible set of actions is signal-dependent. We find sufficient condition for the result to hold under these conditions. We also apply this result to two economic models where risk sharing markets are widespread: A model with futures markets and hedging and a model of life cycle where the lifetime horizon is a random variable. In both cases we show that in the absence of risk-sharing markets (i.e., futures markets or life insurance markets) more information is advantageous. On the other hand, when such markets are introduced we may find many cases where more information is disadvantageous to the risk-averse agents.

Suggested Citation

  • Eyal Sulganik & Itzhak Zilcha, 1994. "The Value of Information: Disadvantageous Risk-Sharing Markets," Microeconomics 9405001, EconWPA, revised 19 May 1994.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpmi:9405001
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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Sanford J. Grossman & Richard E. Kihlstrom & Leonard J. Mirman, 1977. "A Bayesian Approach to the Production of Information and Learning By Doing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 44(3), pages 533-547.
    2. Kawai, Masahiro, 1981. "The Behaviour of an Open-Economy Firm under Flexible Exchange Rates," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 48(189), pages 45-60, February.
    3. Robert A. Jones & Joseph M. Ostroy, 1984. "Flexibility and Uncertainty," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(1), pages 13-32.
    4. Grossman, Sanford J & Hart, Oliver D, 1983. "An Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(1), pages 7-45, January.
    5. Green, Jerry R, 1981. "Value of Information with Sequential Futures Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(2), pages 335-358, March.
    6. Green, Jerry R. & Stokey, Nancy L., 2007. "A two-person game of information transmission," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 135(1), pages 90-104, July.
    7. Baron, David P, 1976. "Flexible Exchange Rates, Forward Markets, and the Level of Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(3), pages 253-266, June.
    8. Kawai, Masahiro & Zilcha, Itzhak, 1986. "International trade with forward-futures markets under exchange rate and price uncertainty," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1-2), pages 83-98, February.
    9. Gershon Feder & Richard E. Just & Andrew Schmitz, 1980. "Futures Markets and the Theory of the Firm under Price Uncertainty," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 94(2), pages 317-328.
    10. Holthausen, Duncan M, 1979. "Hedging and the Competitive Firm under Price Uncertainty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(5), pages 989-995, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sulganik, Eyal, 1995. "On the structure of Blackwell's equivalence classes of information systems," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 213-223, June.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • D3 - Microeconomics - - Distribution
    • D4 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design


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