IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Erosion of Tariff Preferences: The Impact of U.S. Tariff Reductions on Developing Countries

  • Kara Reynolds

    (American University)

The Generalized System of Preferences (GSP), the program instituted in 1976 that allows developing countries to export thousands of products to the United States duty-free, is an important element of U.S. efforts to promote economic growth in the developing world. However, since the program's inception U.S. tariff rates have fallen significantly, thus potentially reducing the ability of the GSP program to encourage U.S. imports from beneficiary countries. This paper estimates the impact of U.S. tariff reductions on imports from the developing world using a panel of import data from 76 countries and 2,389 GSP-eligible products between 1998 and 2001. It finds that reductions in U.S. tariff rates have diminished imports from developing countries significantly, although some countries have been impacted more than others.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/it/papers/0507/0507001.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series International Trade with number 0507001.

as
in new window

Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: 18 Jul 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpit:0507001
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 22
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://128.118.178.162

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Baldwin, R E & Murray, Tracy, 1977. "MFN Tariff Reductions and Developing Country Trade Benefits under the GSP," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 87(345), pages 30-46, March.
  2. Andrew K. Rose, 2002. "Do We Really KNow that the WTO Increases Trade?," Working Papers 182002, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
  3. Dennis G. Beckmann, 1987. "On Estimating the Static Effects of Preferential Tariffs," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 13(4), pages 389-397, Oct-Dec.
  4. James Devault, 1996. "Competitive Need Limits And The U.S. Generalized System Of Preference," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 14(4), pages 58-66, October.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpit:0507001. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (EconWPA)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.