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Nanotechnology and business opportunities: scenarios as awareness instrument


  • Erik Knol



For a few years now, nanotechnology has been recognised as a promising new growth innovator. This leads to a shift from the exploration of nanotechnology knowledge towards a phase of exploitation. The coming years this commercialisation of nanotechnology will be extended. Nanotechnology is a disruptive technology phenomenon, which leads to more difficulties in overseeing business opportunities. Additionally, the fact that high-tech small firms, especially those dealing with nanotechnology, are highly interested in developments in science and technology, begs the question how to stimulate the awareness for (new) business opportunities in nanotechnology within these firms. A promising strategy to stimulate learning and awareness of business opportunities in nanotechnology is the use of scenarios. These projections focused on uncertainty stretch the mental model of entrepreneurs and/or managers and have the ability to activate learning processes. This paper presents the (theoretical) fundaments of scenario usage in relation to the recognition of business opportunities in nanotechnology.

Suggested Citation

  • Erik Knol, 2005. "Nanotechnology and business opportunities: scenarios as awareness instrument," Industrial Organization 0501003, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpio:0501003
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 12

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. van Gelderen, Marco & Frese, Michael & Thurik, Roy, 2000. "Strategies, Uncertainty and Performance of Small Business Startups," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 165-181.
    2. Berry, Maureen M. J. & Taggart, James H., 1998. "Combining technology and corporate strategy in small high tech firms," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(7-8), pages 883-895, April.
    3. Stephan, Paula E., 2010. "The Economics of Science," Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, Elsevier.
    4. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 71-102, October.
    5. Audretsch, David B. & Bozeman, Barry & Combs, Kathryn L. & Feldman, Maryann & Link, Albert N. & Siegel, Donald S. & Stephan, Paula, 2002. "The Economics of Science and Technology," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 155-203, April.
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    • L - Industrial Organization

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