IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wop/wispod/1059-95.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Utilization of U.S. male labor, 1975-1992: Estimates of foregone work hours

Author

Listed:
  • L. Buron
  • R. Haveman
  • O. O'Donnell

Abstract

The percentage of working-age men in the United States who were fully active in the labor market decreased over the 1975-1992 period ("fully active" means working 2080 hours in a year). Similarly, the extent to which men were less than fully active increased. When one considers the number of hours by which men fell short of the 2080 norm in 1992, it was as if 20 percent of them did not work at all in that year, up from 18 percent in 1975. However, because the least-productive workers were the ones most likely to be less than fully active and the most-productive were the ones least likely to be less than fully active, total productivity-weighted work hours did not fall by this large an amount. If men failed to work 2080 hours in a year, most likely it was because they did not work at all; men most often did not work at all because they could find no jobs. Data were from Current Population Surveys.

Suggested Citation

  • L. Buron & R. Haveman & O. O'Donnell, "undated". "The Utilization of U.S. male labor, 1975-1992: Estimates of foregone work hours," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1059-95, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  • Handle: RePEc:wop:wispod:1059-95
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp105995.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Prithwis Gupta, 1978. "A general method of decomposing a difference between two rates into several components," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 15(1), pages 99-112, February.
    2. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    3. Peter Kennedy, 2003. "A Guide to Econometrics, 5th Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 5, volume 1, number 026261183x, January.
    4. L. Buron & R. Haveman & O. O'Donnell, "undated". "Recent trends in U.S. male work and wage patterns: An overview," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1060-95, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    5. Tim Liao, 1989. "A Flexible Approach for the Decomposition of Rate Differences," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 26(4), pages 717-726, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wop:wispod:1059-95. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Krichel). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iruwius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.