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Job Performance and Retention Among Welfare Recipients

Author

Listed:
  • Harry J. Holzer
  • Michael A. Stoll
  • Douglas Wissoker

Abstract

In this paper we use data from a recent survey of employers to analyze the job performance and retention rates of recently hired welfare recipients. In particular, we analyze whether or not the employer experienced each of a set of problems with that employee; subjective employer ratings of worker performance; and employee turnover. The results indicate that most welfare recipients perform as well or better than employees in comparable jobs, and that their turnover rates appear fairly low. Still, absenteeism is pervasive, and often linked to child care/transportation problems; problems such as poor attitudes towards work and relations with coworkers are observed fairly frequently as well. These problems are strongly related to job performance and retention difficulties, and often plague those who quit as well as those discharged. Several particular characteristics of the workers, their employers and the jobs that they hold are also associated with performance and retention difficulties among working welfare recipients.

Suggested Citation

  • Harry J. Holzer & Michael A. Stoll & Douglas Wissoker, 2001. "Job Performance and Retention Among Welfare Recipients," JCPR Working Papers 231, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:wop:jopovw:231
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Maria Cancian & Robert Haveman & Thomas Kaplan & Daniel Meyer, 1999. "Work, Earnings, and Well-Being after Welfare: What Do We Know?," JCPR Working Papers 73, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    2. O'Regan, Katherine M. & Quigley, John M., 1999. "Spacial Isolation and Welfare Recipients: What Do We Know?," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt1mz642ft, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
    3. repec:mpr:mprres:1872 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Daniel Immergluck, 1996. "What employers want: Job prospects for less-educated workers," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 24(4), pages 135-143, June.
    5. Anu Rangarajan, "undated". "Keeping Welfare Recipients Employed: A Guide for States Designing Job Retention Services," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 3779c830a6ca4725a62e0466d, Mathematica Policy Research.
    6. Bruce D. Meyer & Dan T. Rosenbaum, 1999. "Making Single Mothers Work: Recent Tax and Welfare Policy and its Effects," JCPR Working Papers 152, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    7. Meyer, Bruce D. & Rosenbaum, Dan T., 2000. "Making Single Mothers Work: Recent Tax and Welfare Policy and Its Effects," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 53(4), pages 1027-1062, December.
    8. Abraham, Katharine G, 1986. "Structural/Frictional vs. Deficient Demand Unemployment: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(1), pages 273-276, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Blundell, Richard & Francesconi, Marco & van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2011. "Anatomy of Welfare Reform Evaluation: Announcement and Implementation Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 6050, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Nicole D. Forry & Sandra L. Hofferth, 2009. "Maintaining Work: The Influence of Child Care Subsidies on Child Care-Related Work," Working Papers 1175, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
    3. repec:mpr:mprres:7072 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Rebecca M. Blank, 2002. "Evaluating Welfare Reform in the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(4), pages 1105-1166, December.
    5. Michelle Derr & Pamela Holcomb, 2010. "Employer Resource Networks: Uniting Businesses and Public Partners to Improve Job Retention and Advancement for Low-Wage Workers," Mathematica Policy Research Reports af457f270096457a9d4daa3ef, Mathematica Policy Research.
    6. Anu Rangarajan & Amy Johnson, "undated". "Current and Former WFNJ Clients: How Are They and Their Children Faring 40 Months Later?," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 8c1e11723d504a1f9f9186b11, Mathematica Policy Research.
    7. repec:mpr:mprres:3173 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Gunderson, Jill Marie & Hotchkiss, Julie L., 2007. "Job Separation Behavior of WOTC Workers: Results from a Unique Case Study," MPRA Paper 44801, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. repec:pri:crcwel:wp09-09-ff is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Heather Koball & Robin Dion & Andrew Gothro & Maura Bardos & Amy Dworsky & Jiffy Lansing & Matthew Stagner & Danijela Korom-Djakovic & Carla Herrera & Alice Elizabeth Manning, 2011. "Synthesis of Research and Resources to Support At-Risk Youth," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 8353b63284d94941bcb778e1c, Mathematica Policy Research.
    11. repec:mpr:mprres:6779 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Jill Marie Gunderson & Julie L. Hotchkiss, 2006. "Welfare recipiency, job separation outcomes, and postseparation earnings: insight from linked personnel and state administrative data," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2006-07, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

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