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Exporting Spillovers: Firm-Level Evidence from Argentina



We investigate whether exporting firms generate possibilities for productivity enhancement by other firms through spillovers. While spillovers have been analyzed when domestic learn from foreign-owned firms, we consider the possibility of learning from firms that export, irrespective of ownership origin. We find evidence consistent with learning from exporters to upstream producers. Foreign-owned firms that do not export do not generate spillovers. Therefore, our results suggest that export activity, as opposed to foreign direct investment (FDI) per se, is associated with knowledge diffusion to input suppliers. Indeed, the results suggest that FDI subsidies to foster technology spillovers may well be dominated by certain export promotion strategies. In addition, removing barriers to exports can prove less costly than removing barriers to FDI inflows.

Suggested Citation

  • F. Albornoz, M. Kugler, 2008. "Exporting Spillovers: Firm-Level Evidence from Argentina," Working Papers eg0057, Wilfrid Laurier University, Department of Economics, revised 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:wlu:wpaper:eg0057

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kugler, Maurice, 2006. "Spillovers from foreign direct investment: Within or between industries?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 444-477, August.
    2. Andrew B. Bernard & J. Bradford Jensen & Stephen J. Redding & Peter K. Schott, 2007. "Firms in International Trade," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(3), pages 105-130, Summer.
    3. Ann E. Harrison & Brian J. Aitken, 1999. "Do Domestic Firms Benefit from Direct Foreign Investment? Evidence from Venezuela," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 605-618, June.
    4. Ricardo Hausmann & Jason Hwang & Dani Rodrik, 2007. "What you export matters," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-25, March.
    5. Arnold, Jens & Javorcik, Beata, 2005. "Gifted Kids or Pushy Parents? Foreign Acquisitions and Plant Performance in Indonesia," CEPR Discussion Papers 5065, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Blyde, Juan & Kugler, Maurice & Stein, Ernesto, 2004. "Exporting vs. outsourcing by MNC subsidiaries: which determines FDI spillovers?," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 0411, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    7. Olley, G Steven & Pakes, Ariel, 1996. "The Dynamics of Productivity in the Telecommunications Equipment Industry," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(6), pages 1263-1297, November.
    8. Beata Smarzynska Javorcik, 2004. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Increase the Productivity of Domestic Firms? In Search of Spillovers Through Backward Linkages," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 605-627, June.
    9. Blyde, Juan & Kugler, Maurice & Stein, Ernesto, 2004. "Exporting vs. outsourcing by MNC subsidiaries: which determines FDI spillovers?," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 411, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    10. Facundo Albornoz & Marco Ercolani, 2007. "Learning by Exporting: Do Firm Characteristics Matter? Evidence from Argentinian Panel Data," Discussion Papers 07-17, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
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    Cited by:

    1. María José Yepes, Esperanza Arias, Lina Marcela Molano, Ferney Molina, María Fernanda Ramírez, 2012. "Incidencia De Las Variables Del Comercio Exterior (Importaciones Y Exportaciones) En La Transferencia De Conocimientos: El Caso De La Industria Textil Colombiana," REVISTA ISOCUANTA 012353, UNIVERSIDAD SANTO TOMÁS.

    More about this item


    Exporting; Spillovers; FDI; Supply-Chain Linkages;

    JEL classification:

    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General

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